equipment for FT  

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Falco3
(@falco3)
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 2
2019-09-19 16:50:46  

Which equipment would you recomend to get started practice FT.

PCP

SPRING

SCOPE


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Kerndtc
(@kerndtc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 99
2019-09-19 21:56:57  

All budget dependant and what class do you want?

 

PCP

Air Arms s200, s400, s500 or variation of those. 

Marauder field and target is a good start. 

Any high end rifle at a good price. 

 

Spring:

 

Air Arms: TX200 mk3 or TX200HC

Beeman/ HW: HW97, HW77 

Scope:

Hunter

-Hawke Airmax or Sidewinder 4-16/6-24/ 8-32

-Optisan 4-16 

Open/ WFTF

BUDGET: Tac Vector Optics Sentinel 10-40x50

Hawke Sidewinder 8-32 or hawke ED 10-50X60

Sightron siii 10-50

Falcon X50 10-50

The list can go on and on. Just need to know more info. 

 

1: Budget

2: What class are you wanting to shoot. 

 

Cameron


gokidd and DRAGON64 thanked
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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 302
2019-09-20 13:23:29  

Hello Falco3!

I do hope you make it to FT.

Cameron and I are friends, but we generally disagree, LOL! Which makes life interesting 😉

If you go here:

And want to skip to the part you are asking about, go directly to time marker 1: 14: 30

There is some explanation about how to best get into FT.

Now, expanding on that, I would say that the least expensive class to get into would be "Hunter Piston"

You can start with an excellent Multipurpose rifle that you will always find use for: A Mauser AM03, and the best scope you can buy.

At this point in time, IMHO, the best entry point scope is the Vortex Optics Diamondback  Tactical 6-24X50 FFP

It DOES have a 16X marking, so it is legal for Hunter FT (AAFTA rules) and, together, the whole rig will set you back under $650

A good lot of pellets in 8.44/4.53 head size and you can be rolling targets more often than not (that means a little above the 50% hit rate), if you do your part.

You can MAKE your own crossed sticks, and use almost any good grade silicone cushion for people with seating/coccyx problems, and be shooting next day.

IF, later, you want to change divisions you can sell, change, or customize the gun, but the scope will serve you well for the first 2-3 years.

Cutomizing the AM03 for WFTF shooting is as simple as installing a custom spring and two guides. That may cost about $100 done professionally, but you are still WAY UNDER what entering the PCP game would (unless you already have some PCP-lifesupport equipment) cost.

IF you are young and up to manual/hand pump, then a Customized Stormrider (L-W barrel, regulator, and optimized TP), with a manual pump could be your best bet. Same scope. Same entry budget.

For starters, every dollar you put into good pellets for practice will get you more points than the same dollar put into equipment.

Once you are shooting into the 50%, THEN you can think about improving your rig. Do NOT get disheartened if the first match you shoot a 5 or a 7 (out of 50). We have ALL been there and done that.

I've been shooting FT for about 20 years, and I still don't get tired of shooting spring guns.

😉

Keep well and shoot straight (except when there is wind, LOL!)

 

 

 

 

HM


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DonC
 DonC
(@donc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 110
2019-09-20 18:10:19  

@hector-j-medina-g

Hector,

I read,with pleasure,your blog about the Mauser. In your text you mentioned that during a competition you had forgotten to locktite forearm screws. I own 2  brand new Dianas. A synthetic stock spring Diana 34 and a very beautiful woood walnut stocked Diana 340 N-Tec gas ram. I love both of them. The stock screws on the 34 synthetic stock seem to hold tight ,however the wood stocked 340 gasram needs to have screws tightened frequently. I have no experience with Loctite but I have read about a product called Vibratite. According to product info you can remove and retighten the screws without having to remove the product.

Do you have any experience with vibratite? When you remove screws with Loctite,do you have to remove the dried residue and reapply the product? Is is difficult to remove dried Loctite?

Thanks in advance Hector.


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 302
2019-09-21 09:09:27  

Hello Don!

Glad you liked it!

There seems to be an interesting phenomenon when comparing gas spring'ed and steel spring'ed guns:

The gas spring shot cycle is so much faster that we do not "feel" it as being abrupt, but in reality it is much shorter ( and abrupt) than the steel spring'ed one. So, we think that gas spring'ed rifles should "stay put better", but in reality it is only an illusion. A shortcoming of our senses when it comes to high speed events. Sort of like a good nurse putting a needle into your butt cheeks without you feeling it because she is fast (and probably pretty, LOL!).

I have used the Blue, liquid Loc-Tite thread locker, and also the paste-stick form of the same. For things that have to be repositioned, or are delicate/critical enough to warrant a "softer" grip, I would greatly prefer the stick version to the liquid one. 

For things that need to stay put, then the liquid one is better. You can still take things apart, but they do need some more force, steady, and measured.

I've tried Vibratite, but for small screws I have found it sorely lacking in holding power. Larger screws are OK.

So, for your question about the stock screws: I put Blue Lock-Tite in the front, side, stock screws of 34 style rifles, but I use Vibratite on the rear screw and once it has been "tuned" to give the best accuracy, then I leave it to rest 24 hours for the fibers in the Vibra-Tite to harden again.

HTH, Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

HM


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DonC
 DonC
(@donc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 110
2019-09-21 09:55:36  

Thanks Hector,

Following your advice I have been storing the gas ram 340 N-Tec Luxus muzzle down for proper lubrication.

The Luxus model is walnut and I really got a beautiful stock. It has a lot of curl in the grain. I'm shooting Williams peep sight with Gehman adjustable aperture and tapered front post insert. My Diana 52 is equipped the same way thanks to you setting me up with a globe/insert front sight. I put a skinny front post insert in the 52. I feel like I can aim small and hit small with tapered and skinny front posts better than wide inserts. When I bench rest these 2 rifles at 50 feet in the basement, I can achieve ragged one hole groups. It's so much fun. Since I have several scoped rifles iron sights have really captured my interest and prefer them for basement shooting. The spring Diana 34 has fiber optic sights. It took some getting used to them but I now like them too. Tom Gaylord posts that he does not. I feel like it's all good and fun to have both.


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Falco3
(@falco3)
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 2
2019-09-23 18:38:00  

thank you cameron and hector for your response, i appreciate that

one more what´s better break barrel, fx barrel, gas ram or steel springer


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 302
2019-09-24 14:53:07  

@falco3

Different beasts, Falco.

A good break barrel can be as accurate as you need it to be and probably more accurate than you will be, at least as an entry class shooter, for the first year or two. Read this:

https://www.ctcustomairguns.com/hectors-airgun-blog/its-all-about-accuracy  

You can get some idea of the different needs for accuracy in different games.

Once you have mastered the elements (wind, light, temperature changes), sheer fatigue (mental and otherwise), and the intricacies of the human brain that forgets to do what has been done hundreds of times, then you could say that you actually need a more accurate gun. Break barrels also have the advantage that you CAN clean them from the breech. Just be careful. SOME break barrels will be as accurate as any fixed barrel rifle you can match it against. The older HW98's were incredible machines, sadly I do not have stellar reports from the more recent ones. The Walther LGV will shoot rings around many PCP's, let alone other springers. One notch below in budget you will find the DIANA AM03, just look for reviews and you will see what I mean.

There are three types of "FX" barrels, the older guns had L-W barrels installed, but L-W made those barrels specifically for FX. Mostly older guns like the Tarantula, or the SuperSwift, or other sold under other brands, but still made by FX (Logun Solo, RWS Excalibre, etc), do have fantastic barrels. Then you have the "Smooth Twist" which was, essentially, a technology developed to speed up the manufacturing process and to drive down the costs. They do work well, mostly at high speeds. And now you have the "X" barrel that cannot be a barrel proper, but it is a "liner" needing other support / attachment structures. I have not received a uniform opinion about them, some claim them to be the best thing since sliced bread, others are simply having custom barrels made out of L-W blanks. So, "Caveat Emptor".

Gas springs have the advantage of a very fast cycle and consistency in different temperatures. You may see some tests that "purport" to prove differently, but all the tests that have proven this statement wrong I've seen, are made putting the rifles into freezers and then bringing them out of the cold and into warm weather (sometimes humid), without any consideration that the ambient affects the gun more than the inside pressure of the gas spring. For a gas spring to be a gas ram it needs to be adjustable. Otherwise, it is just a gas spring. However modern ""marketing" has blurred that definition and a lot of shooters do not differentiate between one and the other.I would recommend you read the thread on the Sig-Sauer ASP20 for a discussion about gas springs in FT.

Steel springs have the advantage that you can cut them to reduce energy output, and you can space them up (to increase energy output), though everything has its limits. USUALLY, people can work in steel spring'ed rifles, but will have problems dealing with gas spring'ed one. There are exceptions, but this is talking in GENERAL. The mechanics of the steel spring'ed rifle are fairly well known and there are at least 4 companies that will vie for your dollars, somewhere in the universe of those you will find something that suits you. In the universe of the steel spring'ed rifle, you will also find that there are number of "tuners" that do work, some of them good, some of them not that good. Opinions differ as much as beliefs about what makes a good FT spring-piston rifle. And almost as many as what constitutes a good spring-piston shooter.

Going back to my recommendation: A DIANA Mauser AM03 converted to steel spring, can ALWAYS be converted back to gas spring, so if you get tired of what the gun has become, you can go back to the origin. Sort of a "hard reset". And this is because the way the NTec T-06 trigger block works.

So, depending on YOUR budget, YOUR wants and needs, and YOUR style of shooting, you need to weigh all the pros & cons and decide how to take the plunge.

But I would still maintain that you are better off putting as much money as you can into the scope first, and then worrying about the gun.

And, to close, I have only seen 2 (TWO) VERY GOOD SHOOTERS do well with the Leupold EFR's. They are just not designed for FT. Not impossible, but not precisely the name of the game.

HTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HM

 


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Kerndtc
(@kerndtc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 99
2019-09-25 00:16:41  

I don't think it's been stated in the thread, but do you own any air rifles currently that would fit into the sub 20fpe, .22 or smaller category?

I got started in FT shooting a .22 benjamin discovery. I had high power/ quality hunting Airguns but the Disco was the only one that I could shoot in FT. 

What I'm trying to say is, the best practice and equipment for you to get started could be what you currently have. That's what I did, and became rather good with a Discovery I bought on Craigslist for $100. 

Break barrels can be very accurate, I have a $65 Remington break barrel that is a laser. It has beaten weihrauchs in FT competitions. Being tuned and with the proper pellet selected it is extremely accurate.

 Also, I don't think the Budget question has been answered, or the potential class decision. Those two answers would make it much easier to help you. 

Your questions are slightly all over the place. Have you done some research to maybe see what the classes are in FT? 

Scopes are important, but the gun is too. 

To me, it sounds like you need to go to a match that is local to you. Contact your local club and let them know you are interested in learning more about FT. Most clubs have a loaner rifle and will pair you up with an experienced shooter who can help you learn as you do it. 

The best thing about the FT community is the willingness to share our sport. We want to help, we want to tell you about all the equipment options and our opinions on things. 

You can buy a used air arms TX200 for $500+- some. A used or new HW97K for $300-500, a used Walther LGU for $350+ shipping. You could also buy a Diana underlever, or sidelever for $200-500. Scope and rings should be $150-500 for getting started.

If you could answer the questions I originally asked in my first post I can help you more. Otherwise we are all just throwing out information that may not be useful to you. 

 

Cameron 


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Will Piatt
(@will-piatt)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 57
2019-09-25 03:27:38  

Go to a FT match before spending money. Often there are fantastic deals to be had on FT guns among club members that never are offered to the public as they upgrade or sell "back-up" guns. FT enthusiasts will provide good deals to newbs to help "hook" them into the sport. 


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GLPalinkas
(@glpalinkas)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 85
2019-09-25 07:54:44  
Posted by: @will-piatt

Go to a FT match before spending money. Often there are fantastic deals to be had on FT guns among club members that never are offered to the public as they upgrade or sell "back-up" guns. FT enthusiasts will provide good deals to newbs to help "hook" them into the sport. 

I second Will's statement and add that a lot of times the club (or members), like Cameron suggested will have a gun to borrow just to see if you like the game before spending a lot of money. 

Gary

Venice, FL


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phepler
(@deadeye)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 87
2019-09-25 14:16:23  

Agreed- go to some matches and shoot some club loaner guns. Talk to shooters and ask about their rig- they are more than happy to tell you all about it!

I started with a pretty bad break barrel in HFT and soon bought a accurate Benjamin Marauder from a club member. Buying a used gun from a Field Target shooter can be a good thing because often a lot of the fine tuning and upgrades have been done to the rifle before hand. 

Good luck!


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