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which springer to beat around the farm?  

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660grizzlyguy
(@660grizzlyguy)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
2020-03-19 19:02:50  

Don't want to bang up my RWS 75, so I am looking for a springer to dispatch the occasional pest. Have not had satisfactory accuracy from break barrels in the past, kind of lost track of airguns, so I could use some help. Point me to a maybe $200-$300 side or underlever, I suppose a .22 would give me the extra power for pests. What am I forgetting?


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 450
2020-03-19 20:15:52  
Posted by: @660grizzlyguy

Don't want to bang up my RWS 75, so I am looking for a springer to dispatch the occasional pest. Have not had satisfactory accuracy from breakbarrels in the past, kind of lost track of airguns, so I could use some help. Point me to a maybe $200-$300 side or underlever, I suppose a .22 would give me the extra power for pests. What am I forgetting?

Of course my first choice for a utility springer would be a Diana 34, but you threw in the variable of non-break-barrel.  No prob!  Diana 430L, IF you can still find one.

 


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Johnny366
(@johnny366)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 272
2020-03-20 02:00:46  

I agree with JiminPGH, my go to gun is a Diana 34 in .22 cal but you said an unlever or sidelever so you might search the ads and find a copy of the RWS 48 to 52 in a Chinese copy the B21 or B28, (I think) Heavy, but powerful and accurate also in .22 cal. 


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DavidEnoch
(@davidenoch)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 340
2020-03-20 08:02:58  

I would look for a English made BSA Supersport myself. It is lighter than an  R9 with enough power for pest up to squirrels and rabbits. 
I might recommend an RWS 48 or even better, a 54 if you can find a used one and you can afford it, if you have trouble shooting springers. These guns will also give you more power for pest such as raccoons and opossum. 
Post a wanted ad and express the fact that you can use a rough looking gun as long as it is in good mechanical condition. 
David Enoch


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 705
2020-03-20 08:21:47  

How 'bout the FDA bamboo thumb hole?

http://flyingdragonairrifles.org/index.php?route=product/product&path=59&product_id=67

I also like the 54 in 22 a lot, a bit much for tweeties, but plenty big for coons with domed pellets.


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 284
2020-03-20 10:49:57  

Roughter duty ( mentioned not wanting to bang up the 75), .22, side lever or underlever.

Usually I'll look to a plastic stock for rough duty....not that it doesn't get some damage, just that it doesn't show as much as wood. IF wood (which is much more face-friendly) then it bothers me a lot less to dent up plain wood.

Think you're about out of luck for a side lever....are some less expensive under levers.

Not sure about the Gamo ACCU Rifle or Whisper....generally not all enthusiastic about Gamo anything....but do tick all the boxes (plastic stock.under lever, .22) for rough duty and some folks do like them.

IN the bamboo category,Flying Dragons XS46U is the same basic rifle as the Browning Leverage.

Might find a Diana 460 refurb....believe PA lists a refurb at $300....about $400 new.

Personally,while not a farm use, do keep some rifles for rough use down the bayou. I've not had bad experiences with break barrels, but my two break barrels were a little too nice looking to get that beat up/rusty.

Just because you're an RWS 75 fan....lefty and righty:

 

 

 


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DavidEnoch
(@davidenoch)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 340
2020-03-20 12:11:05  

You might consider a Crosman 312, 342, or 392, or a Sheridan Blue or Silver Streak.  The size and weight would be great for a truck gun.  It would also give you variable power so that you could shoot in the barn without shooting through the roof or pump up for large pest.  The pumpers also are good in that they are easy to shoot since they do not have recoil before the pellet leaves the barrel.

A Steroided gun would be ideal if you can find one.

David Enoch

 

 

 


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caninesinaction
(@caninesinaction)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 72
2020-03-20 12:50:54  

Just a thought, have you considered the Seneca Aspen in .22? Price is only $329 new from PA. I had one for a couple of months. Very accurate, hits with authority, and velocity is variable depending on # of pumps. Great gun, composite stock, durable, a little heavy. 🙂 


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660grizzlyguy
(@660grizzlyguy)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
2020-03-20 13:45:38  

Don't think a pump-up would do it. Trajectory would change depending on number of pumps, correct? Accuracy is paramont. A magazine/repeater would be a plus, but not necessary. The Browning Leverage that was mentioned may fill the requirements. Any feedback? Is it a quality unit?


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pluric
(@pluric)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 731
2020-03-20 13:58:56  
Posted by: @660grizzlyguy

Don't think a pump-up would do it. Trajectory would change depending on number of pumps, correct? Accuracy is paramont. A magazine/repeater would be a plus, but not necessary. The Browning Leverage that was mentioned may fill the requirements. Any feedback? Is it a quality unit?

Look at it more as PCP with an on board pump. Nova Freedom, same thing. You get about ten similar shots before having to pump. You can always pump between shots. Magazine for follow ups. If accuracy is paramount it will out shoot a springer.

https://airgunwarriors.com/community/airgun-talk/nova-freedom-pcp-rifle-with-on-board-pump/


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caninesinaction
(@caninesinaction)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 72
2020-03-20 15:22:07  

Pluric did an excellent job of evaluating the Nova Freedom (Seneca Aspen same gun). BB Pelletier also has an excellent evaluation of the gun on the PA website. As BB mentions in his segment, one can pump the gun 3-4 strokes between shots and maintain the same velocity and energy as if the gun was regulated. I personally used this technique when I owned the Seneca. Got excellent results at 65 yds. Quarter sized (maximum) results with JSB 15.89 pellets. As you can tell I am a big proponent of the Seneca Aspen. It's a PCP without all of the hassle. It clearly outshot my Diana NTec 350 magnum, and RWS 54.


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 284
2020-03-20 17:03:09  

Ooops.....assumptions in doubt....springers.

Tried to stay in the lines of your first post, and now wondering how devoted a recoiling springer fan you might be.

Not that springers can't be accurate...but take a good bit of learning/practice.

 

Open to PCP ideas...although a real knock-about one that can take abuse is elusive.


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660grizzlyguy
(@660grizzlyguy)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
2020-03-20 17:51:06  

I hadn't considered PCPs because this is a grab and go tool to dispatch pests, and I thought the charging the PCPs would slow me down. If these new rifles can just be pumped up 5-10 strokes and be ready to shoot, that would be very handy. I was envisioning the $40 BB gun pump-ups. More research. How many pumps to get 2-3 shots off, at the 700 fps level?


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caninesinaction
(@caninesinaction)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 72
2020-03-20 19:53:16  

The Seneca is pumped up initially to its maximum psi, and then can provide at least 10 full power shots without having to pump again. The method that BB Pelletier utilized was, after pressurizing the gun to its maximum, he then (like myself) gave it a couple pumps to keep it at its maximum efficiency: but understand, you would not have to pump until the gun "fell below" its maximum capability for velocity and fpe. Like any PCP, once the gun is fully pressurized, you can leave it in the truck or by the door virtually indefinitely, and its ready to take care of unwanted critters. I for one am a big fan of both spring piston and PCP's. The Seneca Aspen gives you another option that is relatively new and very affordable.


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Jim Bentley
(@jim-bentley)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 119
2020-03-20 21:48:49  

RWS 34!

More accurate than most shooters, built to last and very affordable. 


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 67
2020-03-20 22:44:48  

I'll second Enoch's UK built Supersport  if you can find one. Super accurate guns, shoulder well. light and work horses. When I lived in the UK that was the gun my rugby club lent me to shot rabbits at the pitch.  Old CFXs are nice as well if you can find one in .22. Someone mentioned the Diana 430L, my friend has two and they're nice well built guns as well but much heavier compared to the Supersport and CFX. 


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boscoebrea
(@boscoebrea)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 263
2020-03-21 11:09:17  

A Good break barrel in fine enough,anyhow a side level RWS 48-52 powerful ,tough and accurate,takes time to cock,ok a better choice a HW97K plastic stock way accurate and easy to cock more money butt worth it.Got a HW50s,get it in .22,...Beeman R9 .20.22...My opinion  get a .20 when you can if not get a .22.....Pay more more and get a English or German rifle,Even if you have to pay Used!....remember shorter barrel ,harder cocking,but a farm guy should haven no problem ....I think the BSA can be a good choice,hard to find thou ...Get something with Enough power....over 12lbs.of power Not weight!!

    Again a quality break barrel is accurate and faster to cock....my humble opinions...

 

 


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 284
2020-03-21 18:03:29  

Do believe in at least one "beater" springer (much prefer it to be inexpensive).

Can tell that even the "beaters" are a step above the really cheap Chinese "tool truck" sale springers airgunners use to use/abuse....guess I just got too snooty for those.

HAve three POTENTIAL beaters...although #1 needs a rebuild and #3 is still too pretty.

 

1. Old RWS 34 bought new in 1993, but needing a full rebuild now (although 27 years of use with just repairs certainly isn't bad). Refinished 3 times,cracked stock fixed, new screws....it's got brown spots and lots of blue wear.

Will either rebuild it or call it "surplus" depending one the pivot/piston wear I find inside....rebuilt,it would be in the "beater" category.

2. Cheap Webley Valumax (can read that as "HATSAN"if you prefer) in 5mm. Basically because it was cheap and 5mm.

Figured right on this one for a "beater" rifle. Harsh, took a long time to break in,and a demanding rifle to shoot well.
Something I'd take out into the nasty-stuff, transport by flat bottom boat, ignore the rain,and let it collect the unavoidable dings/scratches/ finish wear.....many of those things are what I remember about summers on the farm back in the day (minus the boat and salt water).

Thinking that starting off ugly helps hide the wear-and-tear of a hard working life....kind of like people in that respect.

#3. Did pick up one of the BSA super sports a short while back....when they were on close-out for about $100 (could have been $99 or $109).

Figured it would make a good "beater" because of the low price.

BSA was a mistake for that use for me....just a touch too nice looking for what would happen to it. Cheap enough,but not yet beat-up enough to use as a beater (yet).


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straitflite
(@straitflite)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 176
2020-03-22 08:56:30  

I'm a Weihrauch fan because I find them much more refined than RWS/Diana's albeit more expensive. I've had an equal number of each come and go and I honestly cannot say that one is more accurate over the other when ME is near equal.

 For power/price/accuracy for pesting the 34 hard to beat, but it can take a beating.

I would forget the cocking method and go for the 34. Just my own .02 cents.


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JW652
(@jw652)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 66
2020-03-22 11:56:51  

   Another vote for the Super Sport. The UK sporting rifles rolling out of Birmingham for 100 years are accurate and rugged. Of special note are their fine, cold hammer forged barrels. Some of my most accurate rifles wear BSA barrels. The package is light and designed for hunting. Lock up problems are very seldom an issue. For me, a break barrel action is just right in the field. It is quick to load and you can feel the pellet seat correctly as opposed to magazine loading. This feature can produce an accuracy effect similar to the difference between a single shot centerfire and a magazine loader. 

  The RWS 34 is similar in its advantages - except that I find the general quality and barrel of the BSA to be superior. But either should serve you well.

  JMO, based on personal experience.

   


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 67
2020-03-22 19:02:05  

There's a Supersport on Armslist at the moment. It's not mine. 


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 167
2020-03-22 22:36:55  

@davidenoch

Quiet. Very accurate at 50+ yards plenty of knockdown power my go to rifle is my Hatsan 135 Carnivore .30 

After you use one for pest control or hunting it's hard to go back to a smaller caliber. Shot placement it's not such a huge factor with this beast.

 


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660grizzlyguy
(@660grizzlyguy)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
2020-03-24 20:41:03  

My head is swimming. Gas ram, PCP, Springer ?  I think the PCP's are out, I just want to grab and go shoot a couple shots, not mess around charging to high pressure. Don't know anything about the rams, Do they have similar vibration issues to springers? I can't see myself leaving anything ready to shoot, would shoot into the dirt if pest disappears. LGS has Umarex Synergis in .22. $180 are they any good? Has gas ram. I like the idea of the recoiless PCP, probably easy to shoot well, but leaving a high psi charge in the tank doesn't seem like a good idea. What to do?


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 284
2020-03-24 20:56:22  

GAs ram acts just about like a recoiling springer....same basic jump-n-thump, but with less "twang" vibration.

 

Don't have anything against them, they do feel smoother shooting,but with all the same rifle motion.


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 167
2020-03-24 21:08:39  
Posted by: @660grizzlyguy

My head is swimming. Gas ram, PCP, Springer ?  I think the PCP's are out, I just want to grab and go shoot a couple shots, not mess around charging to high pressure. Don't know anything about the rams, Do they have similar vibration issues to springers? I can't see myself leaving anything ready to shoot, would shoot into the dirt if pest disappears. LGS has Umarex Synergis in .22. $180 are they any good? Has gas ram. I like the idea of the recoiless PCP, probably easy to shoot well, but leaving a high psi charge in the tank doesn't seem like a good idea. What to do?

I own this rifle ( link provided ) and the XS25 bamboo shown in video They are absolutely amazing shooters. Probably the best rifles made for a great price. You can't go wrong with either one. Mike sells a amazing product. This rifle is modeled after the RWS34. This rifle is 100 times better than the umerex your looking at. And still less if Mike tunes it for you.

http://flyingdragonairrifles.org/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=51

 


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daveshoot
(@daveshoot)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 100
2020-03-25 21:22:58  

There was some very informed discussion of the CZ-634 a ways back, and it seemed like the perfect farm springer/truck gun in a lot of ways. I can't believe I never bought one, being susceptible to stories like that.

I have several Slavia products of greater or lesser origins, all quite good within their range, but the 634 seemed to have hit a sweet spot of cheap, accurate, and very moddable if you care to pursue it... and so fugly you wouldn't worry about the stock (find the gray bedliner refinish posts).

Wonder what old gubb is shooting now? He was a very informative poster and I appreciated his efforts.


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 167
2020-03-25 22:07:00  
Posted by: @daveshoot

There was some very informed discussion of the CZ-634 a ways back, and it seemed like the perfect farm springer/truck gun in a lot of ways. I can't believe I never bought one, being susceptible to stories like that.

I have several Slavia products of greater or lesser origins, all quite good within their range, but the 634 seemed to have hit a sweet spot of cheap, accurate, and very moddable if you care to pursue it... and so fugly you wouldn't worry about the stock (find the gray bedliner refinish posts).

Wonder what old gubb is shooting now? He was a very informative poster and I appreciated his efforts.

These rifles are sweet  I wish I could find one. But for pesting on a farm something in a larger caliber is needed.  At least a .22 for smaller pests.  Medium critters a .25. This is why I always  use my .30 Carnivore.  I have taken a couple of coyotes  that where in our pasture.  And anything  smaller is in for a surprise. 


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straitflite
(@straitflite)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 176
2020-03-26 07:27:33  

I think most understand wound channel size but you keep posting about the importance of caliber, and not much on shot placement. I'm sure you understand the importance of both but given the similar muzzle energy and/or velocity, I'll take what gives the best shot placement every single time. This is an age old debate so please don't take it wrong.


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straitflite
(@straitflite)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 176
2020-03-26 07:37:04  

Quiet. Very accurate at 50+ yards plenty of knockdown power my go to rifle is my Hatsan 135 Carnivore .30 

After you use one for pest control or hunting it's hard to go back to a smaller caliber. Shot placement it's not such a huge factor with this beast.

I have not done much research on the large caliber Hatsans and not really interested at the moment. I certainly could be in the future but I believe those are very heavy guns IIRC? I may be wrong, just too lazy to look it up I guess. I think most would add a scope as well to the mix.


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 167
2020-03-26 13:27:41  
Posted by: @straitflite

I think most understand wound channel size but you keep posting about the importance of caliber, and not much on shot placement. I'm sure you understand the importance of both but given the similar muzzle energy and/or velocity, I'll take what gives the best shot placement every single time. This is an age old debate so please don't take it wrong.

I can place a pellet from the .30 in a 3 inch circle at 30 yards 4 our of 5 times constantly. With open sights. Plenty of accuracy because in reality how many critters do you shoot over 30 yards away.

Yes they are heavy.  But it help with the recoil. Some of my smaller calibers have more recoil.

Hope you get to shoot one someday then you might understand why I use it as a go to hunting rifle.

And the age old debate goes on😁


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