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Stock stippling with a 1/8" Dremel ball mill  

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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 464
December 8, 2019 16:36:32  

So I have an extra stock for my Daisy 887.  I decided to try my hand.  What you see took about 2 hrs.  Here's what I learned. 

1: You need a sharp ball mill and strong reader glasses, 2.5+. 

2: You need to pay attention to the rotation and the grain, to avoid it digging in.

3:  It's hard to keep a random pattern.  I found that if I started "in the middle of nowhere" and made circular daisies of about 1/2", then filled in between them, I got what I was looking for. 

4:  A vertical pistol grip can be a challenge.

5:  Laminate stocks have decidedly different hardness across the stock.

I plan on tackling the for-end as well, but that will have to wait for another day, as there is considerably more real estate to cover.

 

88704
88701
88703
88702 2

 


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rkyle
(@rkyle)
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 2
December 8, 2019 17:48:47  

This is a pawn shop Beeman I used a dremel and a wood burning setup to do this.

IMG 2382
IMG 2381

 


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 464
December 8, 2019 17:59:04  

Very nice work!


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 663
December 8, 2019 19:07:09  
Posted by: @jiminpgh

So I have an extra stock for my Daisy 887.  I decided to try my hand.  What you see took about 2 hrs.  Here's what I learned. 

1: You need a sharp ball mill and strong reader glasses, 2.5+..

It looks good! I like using that technique, too. I've done it more than once, but not a lot--somewhere in between.

I don't know what your experience was on this stock, but in my case, I found that the ball end mills that come in Dremel kits don't last all that long for making perhaps hundreds of impressions, like you have to do when you do stippling. The bits start to dull and completely wear out before long, and it can easily take more than one bit per stock to complete it.

You said you used a hardened mill or bit. I thought the ones that came in the kits I had were hardened, but maybe I'm wrong. And, in my case, I was working with the factory beech wood that came on Weihrauch guns. Like an R1, for instance.

We've been reading for years that beech is a hardwood, but I consider it to be what I would call medium hardness. Sometimes you're fortunate and you get a little harder specimen, but, many times you don't. That's been my experience.

There was a time when I thought I should try to make the stippled area match the wood next to it, as far as the color or darkness, for it to look right. Then, one day I decided to purposely make the stippled area darker than the adjacent wood. It turns out that I like that even more.  It can be done by using a darker stain, or by leaving your stain on longer, or both. I found that the contrast of dark and light really makes the stippled area 'pop' that much more.  But, when doing that, I had to be very careful near the borders, not to overdo it. If you do that, the stain can bleed under the borders and into the adjacent wood, and then you've got an unsightly mess. 

Speaking of not wanting to wind up with an unsightly mess, I've found that a toothbrush is more of a precision instrument for applying and wiping off the stain than a paintbrush, or anything else I could think of, at least when it comes to working near the borders.

I don't know how to do checkering. I have no interest in learning how to do it, so far, although I do like the way it looks, and the surer grip that it provides. But, stippling also gives you a better grip, and I can do stippling. At least the way you did it.

I think some people do it by hand with stippling tools that are made specifically for that purpose. I did a little research on those. I found them somewhere, it may have been on the Brownells site. After trying the Dremel technique, I decided that was definitely my preference. You can cover a lot of territory pretty fast, but as I'm sure you found, too fast isn't good. That's when you make mistakes. Some of them can be hard to disguise.


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 780
December 9, 2019 07:32:40  

I can do ammonium chloride and a heat gun 🙁


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DavidEnoch
(@davidenoch)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 359
December 9, 2019 08:51:37  

One recommendation.  Thin down the finish you use in the stippling area.  I did the stippling on one stock and it came out ok but the true-oil really built up in the stippling.  If I was doing it again I would thin down the finish and just make a few more coats of finish in the stippling.

David Enoch


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rkyle
(@rkyle)
Joined: 8 months ago
Posts: 2
December 9, 2019 11:42:25  

My brother's has one of these Chinese B2.  I like using the wood burner for the stippling.

IMG 2395

 


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chrisT
(@christ)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 33
December 9, 2019 16:38:32  

If you have the ability slow down the bit speed- that will make it last longer. Max rpm on those is way to high for their High Speed steel bits particularly when cutting through finish.  At max speed you are burning rather than cutting not only the material but the bit as well.


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 464
December 9, 2019 20:13:28  

@davidenoch

Hi David,

Based on experience and recommendations, I decided to stain the stippled areas and not apply ANY topcoat.  I believe that is how traditional 10M stocks were treated.  I'll put up some pictures when I'm done. 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 663
December 9, 2019 20:49:39  
Posted by: @jiminpgh

@davidenoch

Hi David,

Based on experience and recommendations, I decided to stain the stippled areas and not apply ANY topcoat.  I believe that is how traditional 10M stocks were treated.  I'll put up some pictures when I'm done. 

Hey Jim,

I'm not trying to micro-manage you here. But adding a top coat might help prevent premature wear through the stain, to where some bare wood starts to show through.

It sounds like you prefer the 'dull' appearance of similar stippling I've seen on many other stocks. I do too!  If you use satin finish polyurethane, you won't get any shine, but you'll still get the additional wear protection. It's just a thought.

OTOH, if you consider a perfect just as it is right now, I hear you. You can always wait until later. If the stain wears too quickly for your liking, at that point you can apply some stain again, then use the polyurethane on top.


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 312
December 9, 2019 22:26:44  

Had the time,so did it "old school"with a shaped punch and a lite hammer. Makes a nice winter project.

This one was stained, but not top coated.

If you don't count the few practice sessions on scrap wood,took a couple of evenings.

Got no problem with the Dremel technique....but I'd still practice a few times on scrap.


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 454
December 12, 2019 16:08:29  

The few times I have had the time to do it, I used diamond balls (you will need at least 3 sizes: Sm, M, & L) and use a medium grit.
This is like stippling and sanding at the same time, and finishes take in more evenly. They also do not "dig in".

They are dirt cheap at Harbor Freight, or directly from Ali Express. Run the dremel at the speed JUST BELOW where the wood starts to burn.

Using the large ball, make a few "centers" randomly distributed in the areas you want to stipple, and then use the medium sized balls to fill in in spirals, or like previously mentioned, daisy-circles, clean up and homogenize the detail with the small balls.
You can learn to go pretty fast, by all means make some serious trial runs in scrap wood.

 

HTH

 

 

 

HM


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Mark.in.AZ
(@mark-in-az)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 129
December 12, 2019 19:33:04  

Here is a tutorial posted by Marty McNaughton, of Silver Streak Sports, some years back on the old Yellow forum.

I have been using this on my stocks and it works really well.  http://www.hamcontact.com/airgun/Stippling.htm

This is basically the same as described by Hector, but with a few pictures.

Hope this helps.

Mark


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 464
December 13, 2019 14:40:41  
Posted by: @jiminpgh

So I have an extra stock for my Daisy 887.  I decided to try my hand.  What you see took about 2 hrs.  Here's what I learned. 

1: You need a sharp ball mill and strong reader glasses, 2.5+. 

2: You need to pay attention to the rotation and the grain, to avoid it digging in.

3:  It's hard to keep a random pattern.  I found that if I started "in the middle of nowhere" and made circular daisies of about 1/2", then filled in between them, I got what I was looking for. 

4:  A vertical pistol grip can be a challenge.

5:  Laminate stocks have decidedly different hardness across the stock.

I plan on tackling the for-end as well, but that will have to wait for another day, as there is considerably more real estate to cover.

 

88704
88701
88703
88702 2

 

So here it is with an application of Minwax Ebony oil stain.  There's enough of the original finish between the divots to give it some nice contrast.

stipplestain1
stipplestain2
stipplestain3
stipplestain4
stipplestain5
stipplestain6
stipplestain7

 

Visuals aside, it does make for a much friendlier gun to shoot. 


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Mark.in.AZ
(@mark-in-az)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 129
December 13, 2019 18:51:06  

Nice job!


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Bob in WV
(@bob-in-wv)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 205
December 13, 2019 21:53:38  

Nice job Jim!

Bob in WV


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awilde
(@alex-from-upstate-ny)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 168
December 13, 2019 22:06:52  

Not bad at all, if you ever feel like stepping up the game you can also look into Proxxon's which offer more power and 20k RPM or make the next jump into pneumatic dental drill types (which have come down in price dramatically now and are all over eBay and Amazon) which go all the way up to 400k RPM. They can make that job real easy with both diamond and carbide bur bits and allow you to start fiddling with a little fancier stuff like the fish scales and whatnot.


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truck-driver
(@truck-driver)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 26
December 14, 2019 11:41:43  

I have a Diana 48 which seemed to feel blocky to me so I decide to sand off all of the factory finish since I wanted bare wood to work with . I used my Dremel tool and a drum sander to reshape the pistol grip and wrist area before stippling with the Dremel using diamond bits and started with the needle point first and then the ball tips to enlarge the gripping surface. 

When finished I I used Min Wax special walnut stain  which I applied with 4-0 steel wool that raised the grain and polished the wood at the same time. Once dried I polished the wood again with the 4-0 steel wool before applying the true Oil finish which consisted of four hand rubbed coats and topped it off with a coat of stock wax.

KIMG0381
KIMG0380

 


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