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Cruisers
(@cruisers)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 82
2020-05-16 08:52:08  

Have not shot a springer for over a year, this one (PW tunes R7) maybe as long as 2 years. Set up shooting at 25 yards. First shot could see I needed to adjust the scope as it was going about 2" to the right and a little high. With each shot adjustments made put it pretty much on POA. Then as each shot went on it's way I had to start adjusting it again. When done I pretty much had adjusted it right back to where it was when I started! I now recall I've gone through this very same routine in the past. Sooooooo, what's going on? I've never tried to just shoot it and see if it would walk itself back to the POA. It sits in a cabinet, NOT touching anything else that would result in any movement. Weird


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Jim in SWMO
(@jim-in-swmo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 263
2020-05-16 13:40:31  

Good chance that after sitting for so long the lube used had settled and when you started to shoot it again the lube was getting redistributed. And part of it may be that you hadn't shot a springer for a while and it took you a little bit to get back in the groove. 


Jim Bentley thanked
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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2020-05-16 14:32:26  
Posted by: @cruisers

Have not shot a springer for over a year, this one (PW tunes R7) maybe as long as 2 years. Set up shooting at 25 yards. First shot could see I needed to adjust the scope as it was going about 2" to the right and a little high. With each shot adjustments made put it pretty much on POA. Then as each shot went on it's way I had to start adjusting it again. When done I pretty much had adjusted it right back to where it was when I started! I now recall I've gone through this very same routine in the past. Sooooooo, what's going on? I've never tried to just shoot it and see if it would walk itself back to the POA. It sits in a cabinet, NOT touching anything else that would result in any movement. Weird

Two things:

1. Make sure that the stock screws are tight. Although, on an R7, there's so little recoil it's usually not much of a problem. Still, they should be tight. If the action is wobbling around too much inside the stock, it could cause the problem you described. Besides, it's a quick and easy check to see if they're tight.

In fact, while you're at it, make sure all of the screws associated with the scope are also tight.

2. If all else fails, try swapping out the scope that's on there now with one you know is trustworthy. A wandering, unpredictable POI is one of the telltale signs of a defective scope.


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glr59
(@glr59)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 98
2020-05-16 16:23:52  

My golden rule for springers. Don't adjust anything until you've shot it 10-15 times first. If it doesn't come back to where you think it should then start checking obvious things first. Stock and scope screws. Then you can start thinking about adjusting your scope. 

Info gleaned from many yrs of driving myself crazy shooting springers.

jerry L.

 


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Jim Bentley
(@jim-bentley)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 119
2020-05-16 16:46:33  
Posted by: @jim-in-swmo

Good chance that after sitting for so long the lube used had settled and when you started to shoot it again the lube was getting redistributed. And part of it may be that you hadn't shot a springer for a while and it took you a little bit to get back in the groove. 

My thought's too.

 


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Harvey
(@harvey)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 103
2020-05-16 18:00:55  

A "cold" springer can have a wandering poi.  Especially when it hasn't been shot in a very long time.  I would say don't adjust anything for forty or fifty shots and see if you can't Kentucky windage it for a while.   As others have said, see if it comes back around.


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Cruisers
(@cruisers)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 82
2020-05-16 20:32:55  

That's exactly what I'm going to do. Check fasteners then just shoot it for a bit then see what happens.


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Tim Ward
(@lefteyeshot)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 51
2020-05-17 09:26:27  

Like glr59 said shoot awhile first. The other day after not shooting it in a long time my B40 was off and not grouping tight at 25 yards, I just kept shooting without adjusting anything till I got warmed up and in the zone. After awhile it was back on POA and by the time I quit it was one holing'.

Also some times you have to shoot a gun some before the reticle moves after an adjustment. Some shooters like me tap the turret with something like a screw driver or small wrench to help it along. Also you need a good group first before adjusting the scope or you might be "chasing the zero" as we said in the Army back in the day.


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Cruisers
(@cruisers)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 82
2020-05-17 12:00:42  

Good point Tim. Will do.


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airmojo
(@airmojo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 213
2020-05-19 06:56:06  

I strongly agree with the above posts about shooting a springer at least a dozen times or more, especially if it has been sitting for a long period of time... and always check the tightness of the screws.

If the rifle can be cocked and uncocked safely without firing it, I would do that first several times to get the action moving while lubing the piston cylinder... then proceed to shoot at the same spot, and watch how your pellets will move and hopefully stabilize.


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 705
2020-05-19 07:58:32  

My go-to gun basically only goes after squirrels and other varmints anymore, anywhere from 3-25 shots per week.

It always gets a 20 pump workout before taking a shot, although it's really ME getting the workout 😉

Those 3 weekly shots actually equals 60 (90%) cocking cycles per week, and seems to have stopped any 1st shot flyers.

 

I did not verify the phenomenon on paper, but did notice a couple misses after I'd been neglecting the gun for a while.

FWIW, that gun won't get tuned until it needs rebuilt, so no I'm not worried about the spring.

 

EDIT

Agree with Tim on chasing zero based on lack of a solid group. My gawd the ammo we've all wasted doing THAT...

 


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boscoebrea
(@boscoebrea)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 263
2020-05-19 11:43:47  

 my experience with like situations...do not adjust the scope..as stated fire some pellets,then tighten things,then fire some more pellets..do not adjust the scope////the rifle is upset,you need to Smoothly work your way back into it's grace....the last thing you do is adjust scope...


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dcw
 dcw
(@dcw)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 72
2020-05-24 15:19:43  
Posted by: @glr59

My golden rule for springers. Don't adjust anything until you've shot it 10-15 times first. If it doesn't come back to where you think it should then start checking obvious things first. Stock and scope screws. Then you can start thinking about adjusting your scope. 

Info gleaned from many yrs of driving myself crazy shooting springers.

jerry L.

 

gotta go along with this ^^^

 


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 167
2020-05-25 21:23:56  

I have a multitude of Springer's. I always rotate there use. This means each is shot at least once a month or more. Any mechanical device needs to be used. One of the worst things you can do is let them sit idly for extended periods of time.

Even in the dead of winter you can shoot a few rounds into a box of paper in your home to keep everything working smoothly. 

You should shoot it 30 or so times and see how things work out. Then don't neglect it for so long again. 


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Cruisers
(@cruisers)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 82
2020-05-27 19:17:51  

Guys thanks for the advice, hope to shoot it some when N.C. dries out. And Tim, on the tapping of the scope. I've wondered for years about that very thing,that maybe the scope would not move exactly the amount I turned it until I shot a few shots. So, doesn't that mean it's not a high enough quality scope? Because the clicks are not 100% reliable?


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