Rws34 cocking probl...
 
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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 14:58:39  

My RWS 34 was working fine today but now I am having a problem with cocking? 

I can open the rifle to put in a pellet but when I try to close the barrel it is not wanting to close (in fact I can’t get the mechanism to completely close:). I had a vortex spring put in the gun about 7-8 years and it has always worked fine.

When I encountered the cocking problem, I put about 5 drops of chamber lube oil on it but it didn’t help. I don’t know what else to do.

Can someone help me out here? I have never really had the gun apart except to oil it. I sent the gun to someone who it the vortex kit in it but it’s been so long ago I don’t remember who did it.

Thanks 

Randy

 

 


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 479
December 23, 2019 16:05:02  

A little more info?  Are you saying that the gun will cock, but the barrel will not return to fully closed?

D34s are pretty straight-forward barrel cockers, without any anti-bear-trap mechanism.  As far As I can surmise from your post, the only thing that MIGHT cause you not to close the barrel, would be a broken spring which is not allowing the cocking shoe to slide forward.

If the gun is cocked but not returned to battery, you have a problem.

Have you tried holding the barrel FIRMLY in full-cock position and releasing the trigger, thereby de-cocking the gun? 

Like I said, more information would be helpful.


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 17:06:19  

@jiminpgh

Thanks for the reply.

The barrel will open and cock but when I try to close it it didn’t want to completely close back. I tried your suggestion of cocking and holding the barrel and pulling the trigger. When I did this the barrel seemed to release and I was able to fully close the barrel but there was still a lot of resistance. I cocked again, put a pellet in and was able to close the barrel but still had a lot of resistance to closing the barrel. I fired the gun and it seemed normal. The cocking action previously was smooth but now I am encountering a lot of resistance on the closing action.


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Jim in SWMO
(@jim-in-swmo)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 290
December 23, 2019 17:11:52  

I hope you haven't been lubing the pivot points of your 34 with that chamber oil. Chamber oil is generally a silicone oil and is a poor choice for lubricating metal to metal contact points such as the barrel pivot. It's meant to be used to lubricate the piston seal and even then it's mainly for the older leather sealed guns.


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 479
December 23, 2019 17:24:17  
Posted by: @randyc

@jiminpgh

Thanks for the reply.

The barrel will open and cock but when I try to close it it didn’t want to completely close back. I tried your suggestion of cocking and holding the barrel and pulling the trigger. When I did this the barrel seemed to release and I was able to fully close the barrel but there was still a lot of resistance. I cocked again, put a pellet in and was able to close the barrel but still had a lot of resistance to closing the barrel. I fired the gun and it seemed normal. The cocking action previously was smooth but now I am encountering a lot of resistance on the closing action.

Others may correct me, but from the information at hand, it sounds like a broken spring.  I'm not sure how confident you are about messing with your gun, but I would recommend taking the action out of the stock and looking closely into the cocking slot.


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 17:28:34  

@jim-in-swmo

No I haven’t been using the chamber oil for the pivot points. I used the spring oil that came with the RWS cleaning kit for the pivot points. 


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 17:30:31  

@jiminpgh

I’m not confident at all. My understanding is that you have to have a spring compressor to remove the spring. I don’t have a spring compressor. I guess I’ll just have to send the gun off to get someone to look at it,.


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 479
December 23, 2019 17:45:54  
Posted by: @randyc

@jiminpgh

I’m not confident at all. My understanding is that you have to have a spring compressor to remove the spring. I don’t have a spring compressor. I guess I’ll just have to send the gun off to get someone to look at it,.

Taking the action out of the stock is not scary at all, as long as the gun is not cocked.  3 Screws,  two in the forend, and one big one just in front of the trigger.  [edit, you need to remove BOTH trigger guard screws.] No tension involved at all.  The only thing you need to pay attention to is this: once you remove the action from the stock, pay attention to the pins in the trigger mechanism, since they are actually held in place by the stock.  Put some masking tape over them to hold them in place.  Sounds a whole lot more frightening than it actually is.

This is really not that hard, and once you have the action out of the stock, you can look right into the cocking slot.  A good flashlight helps.  I'm guessing you will find a broken spring, or a piece of something sticking out of the plastic Vortek spring shield.

This is about diagnosis.  Once you find the problem, you can determine what is the best solution.


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 18:12:50  

@jiminpgh

I had the action out of the stock when I lubed the spring action. I didn’t see anything that looked wrong but I didn’t look that closely and I didn’t have a flashlight. I’ll try this.

Thanks


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Jim in SWMO
(@jim-in-swmo)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 290
December 23, 2019 18:27:28  

Randy, while you have the action out of the stock to look in the cocking slot, break the barrel open. Don't try to cock the gun, just break the barrel open. That might let you see if there's anything caught between the foot of the cocking lever and the front end of the cocking slot that's making it hard to lock the barrel back up.


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 23, 2019 21:10:23  

@jim-in-swmo

Thanks , I’ll look at that too.


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 663
December 23, 2019 23:22:43  

@randyc

Randy, when I first read your post, the first thoughts that crossed my mind where that you had either a broken mainspring, a broken spring guide, or both.

Yes, you might be able to see exactly what's going on if you remove the stock from the action, like has already been suggested. All of these guys attempting to help you here know what they're talking about. So, I'll just make a small comment about removing the rear screw from the trigger guard. Maybe my memory is playing tricks on me here, but I seem to remember that it's just a wood screw that attaches the trigger guard to the stock. But, even if that's true, it won't hurt to remove the rear screw. All that will happen is that the trigger guard will separate from the stock, and you'll need to reinstall it when you put everything back together.

When you look into the underside other receiver tube for a look at the mainspring, use a good flashlight, or you might not be able to see what you need to see. Look for any irregularities in the way the spring coils are positioned in relation to one another. The coils should all be aiming in the same direction as far as the angle, and the distance between each of the coils should be very close to the same. Anything other than that suggests a broken mainspring. That's especially true if you see what looks like Spring coils that have become intertwined.

Seeing that the spring guide is broken usually isn't quite as easy is checking for a broken mainspring. It's a very real possibility that the gun will have to be disassembled to see that.

If you do wind up needing a new mainspring,  I highly suggest you use one that is superior to the factory spring. you mentioned the Vortex spring.  I'm not all that familiar with them. I almost always used a spring from airrifleheadquarters.com. Those springs are made from a very tough steel alloy, and the price is very good, too.

As far as who you're going to send the rifle to, if that's necessary, I don't know if you know who put the Vortex spring in there or not. But, that person or company would be one option. If you don't know who that is, I do that work, and so do some of the others who frequent this forum. My prices are competitive. But, I don't pay to advertise here, so I'm not trying to make this sound like a commercial.

I'm sorry you're having the problem, but, it shouldn't be that hard to get your gun back into good working order.

HTH.


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Randyc
(@randyc)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 11
December 24, 2019 05:25:02  

@ekmeister

Thank you HTH. Lots of good info and I’ll update my findings once I look at the gun again. I’m away from home for Christmas holidays but will check it out once I get back.


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EdS
 EdS
(@eds)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 29
December 24, 2019 12:36:17  

I put a Vortek tune kit in my diana 36 which is the same action and it works great and is very smooth with no twang at all.  Definitely a good choice on the 34.


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Roadworthy
(@roadworthy)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 13
December 24, 2019 18:41:11  

@eds

Which kit is a matter of personal preference.  Air Rifle Headquarters has two options for the Diana 34.  Both are smooth with no twang.  Like Vortek kits both include fitted spring guide and tophat.  I have used several ARH kits with good results every time.  The 34 is a simple gun to work on if you have a spring compressor and they are simple to build.  Good luck solving your problem.


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 663
December 24, 2019 20:25:36  

@roadworthy

 I wasn't trying to be hard on Vortex. I was just posting about the products with which I'm most familiar, and with which I've had excellent results. My apologies if it came out otherwise.


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EdS
 EdS
(@eds)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 29
December 24, 2019 21:01:05  

I have had great luck with both Vortek and ARH springs and kits.  I use ARH springs most of the time as he has a huge selection for all sorts of older guns, but the Vortek kit in my 36 worked especially well that's why I mentioned it.


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Airguntunes
(@scottblair)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 89
December 25, 2019 07:21:11  

Randyc...

In addition to above, be sure to put a few drops of oil on the detent ball, (or wedge, can't remember which one this rifle has) so that the oil gets in behind it.

I worked on one for a guy that was frozen up, and the spring that is behind the ball/wedge was rusted so bad, the barrel wouldnt lock up after cocking.

Good luck, Scott 

 

 

 


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