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Vincent10
(@vincent10)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 13
May 24, 2020 22:24:16  

I am working on turning a RWS 45 old style into a target rifle. The rifle started out as a Crosman Challenger 6100. Over a couple of years I have tuned the action with a Maccari spring and lubricants and shortened the barrel. The muzzle was re-crowned by Mac1 and they added their Gen II steel brake with baffles. With a 4-12×40 scope in a droop compensated BKL mount it is starting to print decent groups with cheap pellets as the spring settles down. 

I'm planning to add weight to the stock using adhesive steel weights to further dampen the shot cycle. Has anyone tried this before on a spring rifle? Should I add the weight behind the cocking arm slot or closer to the breach? 

Thanks,

Vincent

0524202002a~2

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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 651
May 25, 2020 15:22:52  
Posted by: @vincent10

I am working on turning a RWS 45 old style into a target rifle. The rifle started out as a Crosman Challenger 6100. Over a couple of years I have tuned the action with a Maccari spring and lubricants and shortened the barrel. The muzzle was re-crowned by Mac1 and they added their Gen II steel brake with baffles. With a 4-12×40 scope in a droop compensated BKL mount it is starting to print decent groups with cheap pellets as the spring settles down. 

I'm planning to add weight to the stock using adhesive steel weights to further dampen the shot cycle. Has anyone tried this before on a spring rifle? Should I add the weight behind the cocking arm slot or closer to the breach? 

Thanks,

Vincent

0524202002a~2

They could be some pretty nice springers when they were working right. The vintage of that older 45 is easily recognizable by the round pin that is driven straight through the stock, just above the trigger blade. At least from here, it looks like your rifle is in pretty nice condition.

As to adding weight to the rifle, just as you surmised, the location may matter, for more than just the reason of dampening vibration. And, as it turns out, some people have actually had good results by adding some weight to the barrel, as opposed to the stock. In either case, when it comes to where to place it, I have a suggestion.

The placement of the weight, whether on the stock or the barrel, may also affect accuracy. In fact, someone used to sell a slidable or adjustable weight that you could move up and down the length of the barrel, then tighten it In the location that gave you the best accuracy, once you determined where that was.

So, something that might be useful, before you do your permanent installation, is to do some test firing to compare the accuracy results, with the weights located in at least a few different locations fore and aft on the stock or the barrel. They can be held there by something like masking tape.

Just a note in that regard. You'll want to make sure the weights are attached very securely for your testing, since loose weights can cause vibration, and that can result in accuracy problems of its own. In that case, the testing won't tell you much.

You may have to clean off some adhesive left by that tape before you permanently attach the weights, once you know where you want to attach them. But, a little Birchwood Casey Barricade, WD-40, or something similar rubbed on and off with the tip of your finger and will take care of that. Just make sure you use some good cleaner like 409, Simple Green, etc, to remove any residue that the WD-40 leaves behind, before you try to permanently attach your new weights in their permanent position.

There's something else that could affect accuracy, if you add weight to the barrel, whether that's with a muzzle brake or barrel weights. The only thing is, my memory is failing me here. The tightness of the breech-block in the receiver is adjustable, isn't it? I'm pretty sure I have that right, but I'm not 100% about it. It's been a lot of years since I worked on one of them. And, there were a few unique items on those old 45 air rifles, and all of that is throwing me a curve.

Let's assume for the sake of argument that the pivot bolt tension is adjustable. As you add weight to the barrel, you may need to tighten the tension of the bolt, to hold the barrel more securely to get the best accuracy. That's another area that may need a little experimentation, to see what tension at the breech block gives you the best results.

Now that we've covered all that, Let me throw in one more item.

I've also had good results in the past with some rifles, by adding lead weights epoxied into very rear of the butt stock, once I removed the butt pad. I'm hoping yours is removable, held on by screws, that is. Once again, I'm forgetting the arrangement on your rifle.

If it's easily doable, you'll want to keep them located in the lower half of the buttstock, to keep the center of gravity low. And, by all means, be very careful with your drilling, to make sure you don't come out of the other side of the stock (!!!). Marking your drill bit for depth, going slowly, and drilling at an upward angle that's parallel to the  angle of the bottom of the stock may help there. It can be successfully done if you're careful.

And, once again, the temporary method of using tape is very helpful. Just take 3 oz. or so of lead weights, and securely tape them to the bottom rear of the butt stock. I prefer masking tape for that job.  Then, do some test firing for an accuracy comparison. If they provide any Improvement, then you can make the installation permanent if you want to.


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Vincent10
(@vincent10)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 13
May 26, 2020 20:43:54  

I added a a few strips of adhesive weights under the forearm and on top of the breach block. Hopefully the added weight dampens the recoil. If the muzzle weight wasn't permanently attached I'd try the Limbsaver barrel deresonator to see if it has any effect. I plan to do some testing this weekend with superdomes, R10, and Vogel wadcutters. 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 651
May 27, 2020 15:12:52  

@vincent10

Yes, the Limbsaver is the name of the adjustable weight that you can put on the barrel. You remembered the name that I forgot.

Too bad you can't try one. With your muzzle weight being permanently attached, you're kind of 'stuck', I guess. But, you may get good results with the weight you're trying on the stock.

Personally, I tend not to like to shorten a springer barrel if it removes the choke at the end. But, others have said they did it and had it work out fine.


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airmojo
(@airmojo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 217
May 28, 2020 19:10:56  

I had an old model RWS 45... I gave it to my younger brother to enjoy, since I rarely shot it, and I knew he would enjoy it.

The one thing that I noticed with it for shooting accuracy was that, due to the slanted breech block, using a pellet seating tool to push the pellet in a bit always helped the accuracy.


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