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Recycling Ballistic Alloys?  

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Droidiphile
(@droidiphile)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
February 21, 2020 12:14:52  

Greetings my good Airgun Warriors!

I almost always shoot into a pellet trap.  As a result of that, I have accumulated 7.4 lbs as of yesterday.  Now, this ain't tin-can tin.  It is high quality ballistic alloys from the various pellets I have been using.

Recycling?  My thinking at the beginning was to sell all these high quality ballistic alloys a recycler.  It took quite a lot of conversation, but I finally convinced a local recycler, namely Action Metal Recycling, to take them.  Then I find out that they have "no category" for any form of tin, meaning, they don't know how much to pay me for the metal.  In the end, they paid the rate for stainless, a whopping $0.30/lb resulting in $2.24 cash for 7.4 lbs of expended pellets. OMG!  I'm rich beyond my wildest dreams!  😀 

Now I am actually happy that they will NOT end up in landfill.  But I thought tin was more valuable than that.  So I gotta think, there MUST be a place that pays more, just maybe NOT in the SF Bay Area.  🙄 

So I wanted to ask some questions:

1) Do you guys recycle your expended pellets?

2) Can someone recommend a Bay Area recycler?

3) Does anybody use the alloys directly in any way (like the way folks use lead to make bullets) ?

If you make homegrown stuff from these alloys, speak up, because eventually, I'll have another 7.4 lbs, and for a measly $2.24, I'll gladly give them away to someone who will repurpose the metal rather than sending it to landfill.


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Jeff Marshall
(@jmars)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 11
February 21, 2020 14:17:16  

Many guys that cast lead bullets for powder burners or muzzle loaders would love to have your tin for a reasonable price.

 


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 844
February 21, 2020 15:52:49  

it looks like pure tin has a value of about 7.50 a pound but your problem is proving the scrap is pure tin 

and you can't find tin selling for 7.50 a pound 

i would go to a gun range and find people that are casing bullets and offer them the tin at a fair price 

but then again it will take you some time to  get another 7.4 pound 

do your research before giving things away


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Jim Bentley
(@jim-bentley)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 151
February 21, 2020 17:51:25  

Where are you getting tin pellets?

I’ve been casting bullets for my handguns for over 30 years and have always used a small amount of tin to make the bullets harder. My guess is pellets contain very little tin. They are closer to pure lead. I have always added a pound of pellets to my 30 lbs mixture. 


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RedFeather
(@redfeather)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 105
February 21, 2020 17:54:29  

I was wondering the same thing. Most lead pellets are nearly pure lead.


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Citizen K
(@citizen-k)
Administrator
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 473
February 21, 2020 18:03:41  

The key to OPs question is https://airgunwarriors.com/community/airgun-talk/californias-lead-free-ammo-law-recycling-lead-pellets wherein he states that he mostly uses lead free pellets. Such can contain Zinc, Tin, Aluminum and Nickel amongst others.


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Jim Bentley
(@jim-bentley)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 151
February 21, 2020 18:14:47  

@citizen-k

I didn’t realize that, he’s lucky that they gave him anything for that mixture 😁

 


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Droidiphile
(@droidiphile)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
February 24, 2020 10:41:34  

Posted by: @citizen-k

The key to OPs question is https://airgunwarriors.com/community/airgun-talk/californias-lead-free-ammo-law-recycling-lead-pellets /a> wherein he states that he mostly uses lead free pellets. Such can contain Zinc, Tin, Aluminum and Nickel amongst others.

Posted by: @jim-bentley

I didn’t realize that, he’s lucky that they gave him anything for that mixture 😁

I have been talking to Predator about recycling.  Dick (last name ???) certainly praised my recycling ethics, but had no real info.

Since the alloy is a mix that may or may not be recyclable tin, what I'm thinking now is a "lead-free buyback" program from the manufacturers.  My thinking may be completely looney toons, but I can easily guess that these guys are paying a lot for the metals they use.  Why not offer to buy back expended "clean" pellets (like from traps) for pennies on the dollar.  That way, we can recycle, and they get the exact metal alloys they use. 

Why start with Predator?  First, they are forward thinking.  They are acutely aware of the lead free laws in sunny CA.  Second, they already participate in community programs - namely, they relabel their .177 GTO wadcutters as "Journey" and sell at a discount to SAR (Student Air Rifle) participants.

I'll report back if I find anything significant.  How knows?  Maybe I can't convince Predator to "buy" our expended pellets, but I'd gladly waive the whopping sum of for $2.24, and the shipping to Colorado, if they start taking pellets to be recycled. 😀 

Go in peace!  Keep your stick on the ice!


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Droidiphile
(@droidiphile)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
February 26, 2020 12:27:19  

I got a response from Predator.  Mr Dixon states their pellets are "nearly pure tin" and can recycled in the same way as tin cans.  

I broached the topic of a buy-back program, and he said the trouble is that their pellets are made outside the US (by JSB I think) and international shipping of large quantities of metals would be a problem.  However, he said he would consult with his manufacturer and discuss feasibility.

As an aside, here is an article on the JSB pellet factory.  Fairly cool.  It shows how they make the pellets.  The material point is that they make their own alloys in house.  So if Predator pellets are made by JSB, a buy-back would mean they get the exact alloys they need for a lot less cost.  Maybe. 😀 It may not be cost effective for them, which is what Mr Dixon promised to look into.


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