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No Love Left for The FWB 124--Did I Miss Something?  

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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 599
2020-01-28 21:05:46  

Hi everyone. I wanted to ask a question,  because of an ad I've seen sitting there for awhile on the classifieds:  Are there still any fans left of the FWB 124D/Deluxe out there? I have a good reason for asking the question.

I've tuned quite a few of the 124's over the years. When they're done right, they're a really nice spring-piston rifle. (You know, for those who still like springers). While the original OEM piston seals always need replaced after so many years, once you replace one with a new seal from ARH, it's probably going to last virtually forever. And, when you use one of the ARH mainsprings, the twang goes away, and the power increases to about the level of a factory power R9.

The 2-stage trigger it sports is also very-nice when it's tuned and adjusted properly, and even better if you get a custom-made steel trigger blade, so it never breaks, which can occasionally happen with the plastic blade.

The reason I'm mentioning this, is because I've seen an ad just sitting there in the classifieds for a while now. I don't know why nobody's jumped on the deal. If I had the spare cash this week, I would do so myself, plain and simple.

Since I can't buy it, I've decided I'd like to try to enjoy a vicarious purchase experience by watching someone else by it, then help them get all set up with the right parts and labor to bring the rifle up to modern specs.

I want to make something clear: I don't know the seller at all, and we've never had any dealings. And, I won't you getting any kind of kickback from him if you make the purchase. I've definitely seen his name before. But, you should make your own judgments there, as to from whom you want to buy. (No offense intended or implied. I'm just an interested third party here. But, I did find a good BOI reference for him). And, we haven't discussed this, either. But, here I sit, once again, with no project to do right now. I hate it when I don't get to do any tinkering.

I want to clarify 'a thing or three' that prospective buyers might not have noticed:

1. In the ad, it says the trigger's broken. I'll bet some people never read any further. I say that because, if you just read a little further, you'll find that a brand new ARH premium steel trigger blade is already included with the rifle (that part price is normally ~$100). And, once you replace the broken blade with the new one, you'll never have to do it again. When I looked at the photos, I couldn't tell for sure if there was an adjustment screw in the old trigger blade, or not. Even if you need one, JM sells them for about $25. But, it might already be there. I think I see a slot for a screwdriver in the photo. (Since it doesn't say otherwise, I'm assuming all the rest of the internal trigger parts are there).

2. In the ad, you'll find a photo of a rifle stock that has a crack in it. But, that's NOT the stock that's on the 124. It's the stock on another rifle in the same ad, a BSA model. So, you don't have to get a cracked stock repaired.

3. The FWB 124 has a checkered stock, and two sling studs. That means we're talking about the 124 D (Deluxe) version here. That's the extra-nice one!

Now, there is a medium-sized dent in the stock, but the photo shows it's really not all that bad, at least in my opinion. You can have a look. It doesn't appear that it has even broken through the finish. If you know how to do a little woodworking, you can always save that 'finesse' project for a rainy day, if it even matters to you.

The price is $365, and that shipped! There's one on eBay right now for twice that much, And I don't even think the bidding's done yet. This one looks like a pretty good deal to me.

Your part of this: You decide if the offering appeals to you, you buy the rifle, and you have it shipped to you, so you can inspect your purchase. I don't want to get caught in the middle of that. You'll need to buy the new JM/ARH piston seal, and have it shipped to me. It's about $25, plus $6-8 freight from ARH.

My part of this:  I'll do my best $185 tuning job on the rifle for $175. BUT--you won't need to buy a mainspring or a spring kit. I'll include a brand new $35 JM 'Twister' mainspring, and I'll throw in another spring for a spare (you'll probably never need the spare). In other words, you get the springs for free with the discounted tune...

The trigger gets a full tune, and, of course, your new trigger blade gets installed and adjusted.

I have breech seals here, so you won't need to buy one.

If the barrel crown needs refinished for the best accuracy, I'll do that at no extra cost.

(No stock work is included).

Shipping to and from me, with insurance, is not included, same as always. You pay for that.

I'm going to put the link here. It looks like it's still for sale to me. Again, This is ONLY about the FWB 124. (Not the BSA rifle. I'm not working on those at present).

The link:

https://airgunwarriors.com/classifieds/show-ad/4913/wts-fwb-sporter-124-bsa-stutzen-177-and-more-a-few-old-projects-that-i-am-not-going-to-get-to/airguns-springers/

(By the way, if you decide to take me up on my offer, please let me know as soon as you decide. I want to keep a slot open for you and the project. You can email me at the address in the link below, or you can message me through this forum. Thanks).

(If you need a scope, the Tasco 2.5-10 x 42 AO Mil Dot scope that Amazon sells for less than $40 is a great deal. Other places sell it, too. Prices vary. I have two of them, and I like them a lot.  I consider them pretty unbelievable for the price).


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marflow
( @marflow )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 693
2020-01-29 05:26:26  

I see your thinking, by the time you get it done it will be 6 bills give or take

I could get all sorts of HW rifles for that money

but again not a 124

it seems everyone is going PCP


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Gratewhitehuntr
( @gratewhitehuntr )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 541
2020-01-29 07:42:23  

How does a person go about breaking a trigger?


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glr59
( @glr59 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 97
2020-01-29 08:27:00  

I've had a couple FWB 124. Internet sucked me in thinking the FWB 124 was some wholly grail. They're an above average springer with a below average trigger compared to an AA or  HW. I thought about it but adding about $100 for parts if I do the work myself I can get a new HW95 which again has a better trigger. 

Just my opinion. 

Jerry


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RedFeather
( @redfeather )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
2020-01-29 12:31:12  

Yes, 124's can be a crap shoot. I bought one in a gun shop where they wouldn't let me try it. (Had along with me pellets and a romance paperback, the densest backstop money can buy.) But it looked nice, so took a gamble. Upon testing at home, yep, bad seals. The sad thing is, by the time I'd of bought a JM kit, built a spring compressor or shipped it off for a rebuild, I'd have had more money in it than I would have been willing to spend in the first place. Well, you pays your money, as they say. I still may get it tuned one of these days. (Should have sent it off to Paul Watts while he was still servicing them.) Oddly enough, I came across another 124D at a gun show recently for a low price and it had been sent off somewhere to be tuned. Could not pass it up.

The thing about 124's, call it mystique, is that they were the creme de la creme once upon a time and usually beyond the means of then-young shooters. Now that many of us are older, 124's have become more affordable. In today's dollars, a pristine 124 is actually cheaper, hence the nostalgic appeal. Are they better than some of the higher end springers? Maybe, maybe not. I view them as an heirloom gun in the same category as Winchester 52's, Weatherby XXII's and BSA Martini's. Classic examples of bygone times.

How do you break a trigger? I believe some 124 triggers were plastic and  likely degrade over time.


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Bill S.
( @tripleguy )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 257
2020-01-29 13:08:05  

I agree Red - it's the mistique. I think there was an ARH issue that featured one with a sexy pic of the gun with 4 or 5 dead squirrels laying next to it. That issue also had a Wischo Bavaria 70 with a dead bobcat. I used 3 tubs of hand lotion on that issue when I was a teen. I got to work on a couple over the years and after a tune, I got to shoot them. They were nice but nothing really special when you compared them to a Beeman/HW gun. I suppose back in the period they were the cats azz but once Beeman began importing HWs and you got to see what a nice trigger was like they were just OK.


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 13:13:16  
Posted by: @marflow

I see your thinking, by the time you get it done it will be 6 bills give or take

I could get all sorts of HW rifles for that money

but again not a 124

it seems everyone is going PCP

I think you hit the nail on the head. You could buy other things for the same money, but it just wouldn't be a 124. To the right person, and he's still out there, that's going to matter.

Even if you include the cost to get it fixed, a lot of 124's have sold for a comprable price, or even more. There's some unique history attached to this particular air rifle that isn't attached to any other rifle. The people who are fans know why they're fans.

Now, some people will think I'm saying the appeal of the 124 is all about the heirloom or collectability value of the rifle, but that's not true. The 124 offers a unique, modern day, real-world performance package of its own, even when compared to the HW95 or Beeman R9.

Once properly repaired and tuned, like I wrote, the rifle will deliver R9 factory performance, but in a slightly-lighter, slightly-more-compact package. Once you mount a scope on top, which I did on a couple dozen of them over the years, for testing, I found them to be an almost perfect, moderate-weight package of springer performance.

Did I forget to mention accuracy? They're perfectly capable of delivering that, too. And, a lot of people don't know there's a wonderfully-crisp two-stage trigger that often lies pretty well hidden inside the FWB 124. You just have to know how to find it. (More on that in another post I'll put a little further down the thread here).

But, you're right again. It seems like everyone IS going PCP. However, they're still not the only game in town. I hear from a lot of people who still own and shoot springers.

I liken it to the situation with the recurve bow versus the compound bow: The compound bow certainly offers several great advantages compared to the recurve bow. Yet, there are a lot of guys out there who still enjoy the experience, and, even the challenge of shooting a recurve bow. That's still true to this day. I tend to view springers in the exact same light. I'm not the only one.


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Gratewhitehuntr
( @gratewhitehuntr )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 541
2020-01-29 13:22:59  

Incorrect.

The answer we were looking for was 'Crossbow'.

😉


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 13:45:23  
Posted by: @redfeather...
Posted by: @redfeather

"Yes, 124's can be a crap shoot. I bought one in a gun shop where they wouldn't let me try it... (Should have sent it off to Paul Watts while he was still servicing them.) " 

🙂

..."The thing about 124's, call it mystique"...

If the appeal of an air rifle like the R9 should be called, "mystique", I say you're right.

"How do you break a trigger? I believe some 124 triggers were plastic and likely degrade over time".

That would definitely-be at least half of it.  Others were probably forced to fire the rifle when they're weren't in the 'fire' position'. (Please see more details in my reply to @gratewhitehuntr about that, since he asked first).  Thanks.


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 13:57:15  
Posted by: @gratewhitehuntr

How does a person go about breaking a trigger?

I don't know all the possibilities, but I do know it happens.  Just like with the one in the Classifieds.

How about these 4?:

1. The plastic was old, and/or the rifle was left in an overheated space for an extended period of time, so it finally gave out when the owner pulled the trigger blade that one last time (as in,'the straw that broke the camel's back').

2. Someone used to shooting firearms, who didn't know that A LOT of air guns come with an automatic safety, knew he'd cocked and loaded the rifle.  So, he thought he just needed to pull the trigger blade harder--a lot harder. *

3. Someone thought the rifle was cocked, but it wasn't.  He also thought the answer was to pull the trigger blade harder--a lot harder. *

4. The steel adjustment screw in the plastic blade was forced past its stopping point.  (Sometimes the E-clip on the screw falls off first, and saves you there).

* I may need to give these guys a break. Maybe they'd shot a Turkish-made Winchester 1000x air rifle, or its variants, in the past.  I tuned a couple many years ago.  The trigger weight from the factory was about 12 lb. IIRC.  The first time I shot one, the blade was so hard to pull, I triple-checked to make sure the rifle was cocked (it was), and the safety had been released), (it was).  There was nothing left to do but pull harder on the blade.  It fired, and I'm happy to say the blade didn't break (!!!).  I was able to rework the triggers to get the weight down to something more like ~3 lb. IIRC.

 


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DavidEnoch
( @davidenoch )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 312
2020-01-29 14:01:50  

The appeal of the FWB 124D to me is the light weight, and light cocking weight compared to the power output.  It's almost R7 cocking weight and R9 power.  This makes it a fun plinker and hunting rifle for smaller critters.

The one negative about them to me is that the way I hold them with my version of the artillery hold the gun bounces vertically with the forearm pulling up away from my front supporting hand.  That doesn't happen with any other spring I shoot.

David Enoch


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 14:23:46  
Posted by: @davidenoch

The appeal of the FWB 124D to me is the light weight, and light cocking weight compared to the power output.  It's almost R7 cocking weight and R9 power.  This makes it a fun plinker and hunting rifle for smaller critters.

The one negative about them to me is that the way I hold them with my version of the artillery hold the gun bounces vertically with the forearm pulling up away from my front supporting hand.  That doesn't happen with any other spring I shoot.

David Enoch

Thanks, David.

The vertical bounce--are you using a scope, and if so, how much does it weigh?  I mean, does it happen to be a light 'mini-scope' or Beeman SS Short Scope? 

I found something similar when using open sights, or a very-light scope.  I got much-better results with a mid-weight scope, like that Tasco Varmint scope that Amazon sells for $30 shipped. It weighs 19 oz.  That still made for a pretty-light weight rig compared to heavier rifles with the same scope. 

I own 2 of them, both holding-up very-well on springers:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000V2BLU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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DavidEnoch
( @davidenoch )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 312
2020-01-29 14:26:00  

@ekmeister

I have a Beeman 66RL on that rifle.  It's not a light as a Short Scope but it is not heavy.

David Enoch


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 14:50:47  
Posted by: @davidenoch

@ekmeister

I have a Beeman 66RL on that rifle.  It's not a light as a Short Scope but it is not heavy.

David Enoch

Since you said, "R9 power", I'm assuming you upgraded the spring with one from Maccari.  He uses the best steel alloys in his springs.  So...

If you haven't done it yet, you can usually calm the shot cycle a bit down by doing this:

Have a good, safe backstop at the ready.  I like to use a 2x2 or 2x4.

Cock the rifle and leave it cocked for 2 hours, (laying on a carpeted floor, with the muzzle aimed at the 2x4, about an inch away).  Then, shoot 5 pellets to 'rebound' the spring to normal velocity.  You won't hurt it.  Do it a second time.  You won't hurt the spring. 

Then test the shot cycle again, and see if its gotten any better.  It usually works, with no degrade in velocity, unless it's something like 5-10 fps. I consider that a very-fair trade-off.

When I have the rifle cocked and aimed at the 2x4, I lay a piece of 8x10" printer paper across the rifle that says, "Gun Is Cocked!!!  2:30 PM!!!"  I put the rifle the same place I'm going to be, so I won't forget about it.  You can lay a piece of cloth across the muzzle and 2x4, to catch any errant splinters should the trigger accidentally release.  FWIW, I've never had that happen once.

Just in case this sounds like heresy, JM told me I could leave one of his R1 springs cocked overnight before, to soften the shot cycle.  And, if THAT sounds like heresy, since you know both 'Yellows' so well, I'm sure you've seen the results of the test that was done many years ago, where someone left the gun cocked for a week, then more.  After some 'rebound shots', the velocity loss wasn't all that bad.  In fact, at the 1 week mark, I seem to recall that it was fairly negligible.  (I'm not suggesting you leave your springer cocked for days or weeks, whether it has a metal spring or a gas one.  I consider that heresy).


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DavidEnoch
( @davidenoch )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 312
2020-01-29 15:14:14  

Thanks for the advice.  It does have a JM kit in it but I did not set the spring.

David Enoch


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JW652
( @jw652 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 60
2020-01-29 15:18:40  

Interesting discussion.

When Robert Law introduced the 124 to the US market around 1971, it was top of the line. But as others have suggested, current products are just as good - or better - depending on your point of view and use of the rifle. For me, as a collector, it is impossible to imagine not owning one - and using it. For me, the 124 is a reasonably powerful, light and compact field airgun that is also capable of target accuracy.

One thing that makes it interesting is its cross-over appeal. Serious authors, such as Ross Seyfried and others who usually write of the quality of fine British doubles and German drillings have sung its praises. It is not so much about mystique as the timeless quality of a fine springer. According to Beeman, its demise was attributable to the cost of production and the refusal of FWB to cheapen the means of production.

As the owner of a good shooting a 124, I do not need another - unless, of course, it was tuned by Paul Watts. However, show me a reasonably priced 127 and it will be mine in a heartbeat.

 


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marflow
( @marflow )
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Posts: 693
2020-01-29 15:31:03  

someone mentioned plastic triggers breaking, it is the nature of the beast and see the 124 is on the older side of plastics they just fail

and is the 124 a collectors rifle to be shot every once in awhile or a daily shooter

I think it is a prized air gun that the owner says to himself, I own one of those and is proud of that fact

and on the pricing, they were a hard find a few years back but lately you see quite a few of them and some are way over priced

maybe there interest is waning


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 16:57:36  
Posted by: @marflow

someone mentioned plastic triggers breaking, it is the nature of the beast and see the 124 is on the older side of plastics they just fail

and is the 124 a collectors rifle to be shot every once in awhile or a daily shooter

I think it is a prized air gun that the owner says to himself, I own one of those and is proud of that fact

and on the pricing, they were a hard find a few years back but lately you see quite a few of them and some are way over priced

maybe there interest is waning

"Is the 124 a collectors rifle to be shot every once in awhile or a daily shooter?"  Excellent!  Happily, it's both. 

1. Put a Maccari spring and seal in it, give it a decent tune with modern lubes, and you can shoot it everyday for years, and never wear it out.  In fact, you'll WANT to shoot it everyday.  2. But, it's a dual-purpose rifle in a way that most aren't.  You can put a nice rack on the wall where you can hang the gun, so your guests can see it, and it becomes a good conversation starter.  Tell them the history of the Feinwerkbau company and the rifle.  And, by all means, don't leave out the part about the Olympics!  Just don't mount the rack too high.  You'll want it to be in easy-reach so you can take it down and shoot it whenever you want.  

That trigger is capable of excellent 2-stage operation, like I wrote.  Even if you have one with a plastic blade, as long as it isn't broken, of course.  Since it IS plastic, a back-up is a great idea.  Note that the one in the Classifieds comes complete with a new JM steel trigger blade.  A buyer will never need to replace that one.  And, it's a $100 part.  Subtract that from the sales price that includes shipping, and the price starts looking pretty good.

I need to post this info about why the triggers get such a bad reputation as a reply to the poster who made the comment, but I'll put it here, too:

The adjustment screw in the 124 trigger blade is capable of a lot of turns, let's call it '10' to make the point (that's close).  The sweet spot in the adjustment range is MUCH smaller, something like 1/2 turn at the most.  Now, simply do the math, please.  You've only got a 5% chance of being in the right place on your 124, or the trigger won't have a 2nd stage at all, and the trigger pull will be long and creepy.  You'll need to be patient to find the right spot.  But, it IS there. 

The sad thing is that a lot of people never find that 1 in 20 spot in the range.  They feel, 'long and creepy', they try adjusting the screw a little, and just give up.  I mean, after all, they've read all the posts by other owners that say the trigger is 'crap'.  They figure they got taken.  No, not true--it's in there!  I want to say it better. 

There are at least a half-a-dozen long-standing, well-respected members of this forum, and the old forum, who have seen me make this same statement about the 'hidden' trigger in the 124/127 before.  I've gotten phone calls and emails from them saying this:

"Thanks for posting that about the 124 trigger.  I already figured it out, but you were right", Or, "Mine was exactly like that.  Then, I took more time to find that right place in the adjustment range.  Now it's great.  Thanks".

Of course, like a lot of triggers, the second stage can be made even more-crisp if you stone the sears.  I've done a lot of that stoning work on the FWB 124 trigger over the years, and it works.  It also helps a lot to remove the 30+ year old, gunked-up factory trigger lube with something at least halfway slippery.  Apparently, 25 or 30 years ago, FWB and Weihrauch got their amber-colored mystery grease out of the same big 55 gallon drum.  It turns from lubricant-into-glue over time.  That's not good.  Even some regular non-detergent motor oil would help.  Now, I use something a lot better than that on the ones I work on, it doesn't age like that.  But, I hope I made the point about the rifle having a pretty-nice 2-stage trigger, if you do what's needed to find it.

Even if you have one with a plastic blade, as long as it isn't broken, of course.  Since it IS plastic, a back-up is a great idea.  Note that the one in the Classifieds comes complete with a new JM steel trigger blade.  It's a $100 part.  Subtract that from the sales price that includes shipping, and IMO, the asking price starts looking pretty good. 

In that regard, the bidding on Ebay for a 124 D a day or two ago was almost $800, and still rising.  The seller posted the comment that was very-close to, 'it hasn't been tested, but I think it still shoots'.  I'd be willing to bet that one will be needing a piston seal replaced, at the very-least.  There was another one on Ebay a month ago, and the bidding on that one also went pretty-high.

(Dear Marflow, I hope you don't feel like I've 'opened the floodgates' on you here.  If so, my apologies.  The only 3 comments made with you in mind were 1. the one about 'collector's/everyday rifle', 2. the rifle in the ad already includes the unbreakable steel trigger, and 3. the part that there's apparently still some current interest in the gun. The rest of it was just information about the 124 rifle in general.  I posted it here, because it seemed related.  Thanks).


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Hooligan
( @hooligan )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 113
2020-01-29 17:34:45  

For those that were not following the latest Ebay auction on "what appeared to be a collector grade FWB 124D. Sold just moments ago for 1300.oo and yes appeared to be walnut which jives with date/serial number of rifle.

Cheers


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tallpaul
( @tallpaul )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6
2020-01-29 17:36:33  

I have three at the moment... dad had bought a 124d from ARH and as a kid I grew up reading the ARH catalogs and my first was a self paid for HW50 43 or so years back... I loved it but always liked dads 124d... After the internet came about and finding airgun forums I started to yearn for many of those old guns I grew up reading about. I found a 124 d not too many years after I found the forums circa 200o at an estate sale where airguns weren't valued. I grabbed it so fast it wasn't funny... then a bud who is into airguns traded into one that needed some help and knew I was into them I got it for a decent price and could not let it go. I have rebuilt my two and upgraded to the ss triggers. I enjoy them... I got dads years back and  after he passed it won't likely ever leave my tool chest 🙂 I have a "thing" for older HW's and the FWB 124's it seems They are easy to shoot and handle so nice.. n look great to boot! 

 


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Beeman22
( @beeman22 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
2020-01-29 17:38:57  

I'll throw in another possibility with the trigger: It could have been shipped out of the stock and gotten bashed that way. Since the rear trigger guard screw goes directly into the stock (unlike an HW), you can't easily protect the trigger if it's out of the stock. I had this precise thing happen to me and that gun had the factory METAL trigger! It arrived broken cleanly in two - fortunately, the seller was an honorable man who took care of things. 

With respect to the gun itself, I'm guilty of falling in love with these and currently own...let's just say several. The intent was to mix and match various components from my purchases to build a couple of 99% beauties - one each scoped and open-sighted. That project is still coming along. Currently, I have a 99% scoped gun that could still use a little tuning, and a 90% open-sights gun that I bought for the Macarri walnut stock that it was wearing (and somehow nobody else on GB had noticed!). I had no intention of keeping the action and wasn't even sure the seal would be good, but it turns out it has been marvelously tuned by somebody and is the best shooting example I've encountered.

Tuned right, they are exactly as David said: R9 power (or close, I prefer mine right around 12fpe or so), with R7 cocking effort. I agree with Ed on the trigger: it's not going to be a Rekord, but they can still be very good when done right. And there's always the fact that FWB does know something about making barrels...

I've had a nice HW95 .22, a HW98 tuned by JIPA, and a R9TK built by JM himself, sitting in a David G stock.  I sold the first, hardly ever shoot the second, but will probably never part with the R9TK.  If I HAD to choose between keeping it and a perfectly tuned FWB124, it's a coin flip for a bunch of reasons. But the fact of the matter is I end up reaching for one of my 124s more often. 


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Beeman22
( @beeman22 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 95
2020-01-29 17:43:28  
Posted by: @hooligan

For those that were not following the latest Ebay auction on "what appeared to be a collector grade FWB 124D. Sold just moments ago for 1300.oo and yes appeared to be walnut which jives with date/serial number of rifle.

Cheers

It is certainly a nice gun...but that is an absolutely crazy price.  I'd take my JM-stocked one over that any day! Come to think of it, I paid less for BOTH of hese (including the Nikon scope) than that one on ebay!  For the right collector, that one is really nice, but I think I got the better value!!

FWB twins

 


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Hooligan
( @hooligan )
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Posts: 113
2020-01-29 19:12:39  

Guys, you are all singing music to my ears with regards to these 124's.

Don't have time to say more but should be asking ed here if he doesn't mind us highjacking the original thread. Easy for me to get side tracked when ever I see FWB 124/27.

Cheers


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
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2020-01-29 20:03:01  
Posted by: @hooligan

Guys, you are all singing music to my ears with regards to these 124's.

Don't have time to say more but should be asking ed here if he doesn't mind us highjacking the original thread. Easy for me to get side tracked when ever I see FWB 124/27.

Cheers

For the most part, I don't feel like anyone is hijacking anything here. I like the open discussion. Thanks for the consideration, though.

There is this one thing. I wish some people would stop thinking that 'a certain tuner who shall remain nameless' is the ONLY game in town. Or, if they do think that, I wish they wouldn't post it in a thread that I started.  I wouldn't do it to you in your thread. I'm not going to hold some kind of grudge about it, but, think about it. Would you walk into Giuseppe's Italian Restaurant, then say loud-enough for everyone to hear, "The only good Italian food is at Pasquale's Italian Restaurant, down the street!"? Um, I think not.

Anyway, I've successfully tuned a lot of these 124 rifles, probably more than 20 of them. I was able to get good accuracy, smoothness, and a nice trigger out of every one of them. I also did some wood work on more than a few of them. In particular, that would be relieving the inside of the stock forks where the wood was rubbing against the cocking lever. Then, applying the right stain and poly work, so they looked right. If someone else said they did 120 of them, no problem. I knew what I was doing with the first 1.

I can sum it up. Let me relinquish my own words, in deference to the words of our famous and beloved Matthew Quigley.  When it comes to any and all of the other springer tuning guys out there, I'd say it like this:

"This ain't Dodge City, and you ain't Bill Hickok".

(Oooh, I bet someone's mad at me now.  Hey, I didn't mention names or a head count.  And, this is someone else's forum, so no offense meant, Mr. Moderator, Sir). 🙂

There really is room for more than one of us air gunslingers in this town. And, I hope you guys all have your sense of humor on, LOL.


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Kingfisher1961
( @kingfisher1961 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 235
2020-01-29 21:06:02  

Ed

What a passionate plea on behalf of the venerable FWB124!  God bless you. Personally,  it's my favorite airgun....period. 

Mystique ?  To a degree. Preference. ..100%!  I can buy any car I want, but I drive an old Jeep Wrangler because I prefer it.  It's a Jeep thing....Jeep owners say.  I can afford a top end pcp, but I prefer my 124s.  It's an FWB124 thing. lol

Dollars and cents make no sense in this discussion.  You either got bit by the FWB124 bug or not.  I got bit way back in 1983 and have never looked back !

20190413 101703 1555165966077 resized

 


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ekmeister
( @ekmeister )
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 599
2020-01-29 21:19:52  

@kingfisher1961

Thanks.  And, yours is a beauty!!

(Oh, almost forgot this part).

Some have posted that they can't see the appeal.  A few here, like yourself, have said they can't deny or ignore the appeal.  That's the kind of buyer/owner I was referring to, but you guys said it better!


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bf1956
( @bf1956 )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 128
2020-01-29 21:20:57  

Now who's stock is that? you guy's are drivin me nuts, well just more nuts. You know I want commit to this but can't justify havin a3rd.


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tallpaul
( @tallpaul )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 6
2020-01-30 06:34:51  

@bf1956

who do you have to justify it to? Your other 2 wont really get jealous... they likely would prefer ya get another old gal in the house instead of one of them newer sexy models! I say come join the Triple 124 club- I mean there aren't many of us :p

 


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Limbshaker
( @limbshaker )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 60
2020-01-30 09:18:29  

I'd really love to buy that rifle in the classifieds. I really need a piston for another FWB124 I'm working on. But I'm not going to pay new HW95 money for a broken rifle that needs $100 in parts to get going. 

I too was lead to believe the FWB124 was a magical rifle. They are well built (well, mostly) and very accurate (mostly). But they are far from perfect:

The barrel detent isn't very robust and can cause accuracy issues especially if you don't install the breech seal correctly or the rifle has a lot of miles on it.

The trigger is crisp, but heavier and nowhere near as nice as a Rekord. Messing with the adjustment screw too much will usually leave you with a trigger that hangs, which for some unbelievable reason some guys praise as a desireable feature. 

The safety arrangement is an absolute joke, and is flimsy and imprecise.

The triggers on some were plastic and get brittle with age, and the whole mechanism looks like something out of a Gamo. 

The open sights are plastic

The heavy piston and long spring in a fairly light rifle makes for a somewhat hold sensitive shot cycle, and you are rewarded with sub 12fpe power in a lot of guns, particularly the older ones with tight tubes. 

All things considered, you will be money ahead with an R9 or an HW95 or my personal favorite, an R10. They are better built (except for their .22 barrels which are junk), have better triggers, are more tuneable with various aftermarket parts, and you aren't stuck buying a $125 trigger if yours get's lost or breaks. I wasn't there to see the FWB make it's debut in the airgun world, so I don't have any fond memories of it being a dominant rifle. So the steep prices because of nostalgia don't compute for me. If i'm going to pay for a vintage gun, my money goes towards an HW77K MK2 25mm piston, or an R10 both in .177. But everyone is different, and luckily we have enough options so that we can all find what we like! And sometimes, it's fun trying them all. So if you've never shot an FWB 124 that may be reason enough to try one in itself.   

**I still have an early FWB 124, and there is one area that it absolutely excels over any of the Weihrauch offerings. And that is in handling and feel. The stock shape/fit and the balance on the FWB 124 is second to none IMO. It points and handles absolutely beautifully. The stocks have a palm swell on the pistol grip, nice checkering, and the sling studs are a classy touch. Well, unless you get the "standard" version, then its a crude plank of beech. 

 


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Gratewhitehuntr
( @gratewhitehuntr )
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 541
2020-01-30 10:14:59  

Why don't you tell us how you REALLY feel?

😉


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