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How shootable is the Diana 48?  

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Chemclay
(@chemclay)
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 41
November 11, 2020 13:26:31  

If you own or have experience with the above, please comment.


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ray in wi
(@ray-in-wi)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6
November 11, 2020 14:15:59  

I had one for about 5 or so years in .22 (scoped). I bought it used on the old yellow I believe. It was/is stupid accurate with JSB's, the first pellet I tried...and stayed with. Was a tad heavy for walking around the woods,  but for pesting around the sheds and out buildings, well, it is one of those guns that made you look good because it was so accurate.

I still regret selling it....... to my best friend a couple of years ago for some pests he had taking over his yard and garden. He was not an air gunner but just loves how accurate that 48 is! Now he is just a little smarter than I am as he will never sell that 48!!

Currently I have a 52 in .25 (rarely used, a DWC group buy, not broken in yet, still open sights) and a 54 in .22(scoped, very accurate but not broken in yet)

I have sold a couple of air guns but that 48 is one that I miss the most. I don't know if it was tuned but she did have some wear to it. Smooth and did I say accurate?

HTH

Regards

Ray  


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 683
November 12, 2020 02:51:22  
Posted by: @chemclay

If you own or have experience with the above, please comment.

I owned an RWS52 in .22 caliber for several years. I don't think they make the 52 version anymore. It had an identical action, but, with a prettier, more ergonomic stock, with a raised, Monte Carlo cheekpiece, and checkering on the pistol grip and forend. I had to pay an extra $100 extra for that stock, and never regretted it.

The added weight of the 52 stock made it even more stable than the 48, which isn't light to start with. The nicer stock shape and checkering made it more comfortable to shoot, in my opinion. That's to say, I've shot both.

But, if you have the 48, you can make your own raised cheekpiece, by adding an inexpensive Cheek-Eez adhesive rubber cheek pad from Brownells. And, if you want to add some weight, for what I consider better balance, you can install lead fishing sinkers in the butt stock.

The model is considered a magnum springer, and it deserves the name tag when it comes to both power, and shot cycle/recoil. To give you an idea:

A soft-tuned 48 or 52 can pretty-easily produce about the same velocity as a power-tuned Beeman R1/Weihrauch HW80.

Because of the recoil, plan on buying a very-sturdy scope, suitable for use on springers. Or, perhaps, use the Diana ZR scope mount.

I found the 48/ 52 easy enough to carry for shorter excursions. If I was going to do an all day hike, I'd probably add a sling.

I had to sell the rifle, to fund a quick relocation, about 10 years ago, IIRC the date. I still miss that air rifle.


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Shambozzie
(@shambozzie)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 113
November 12, 2020 06:40:13  

Whitefang tuned my rws 48 .177 to shoot jsb 10.3 @ 875 mv. A hawke varmint mounted on rws lock down mounts keep things rock solid. Have taken starling out to 75 yds. I would highly recommend a Jm zrt spring . Tons of power and no spring twang. 


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MDriskill
(@mdriskill)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 203
November 12, 2020 08:57:12  

Take this FWIW as it was a LONG time ago, but I had a 48 when they first came out. I ended up not keeping it, as it was unnecessarily powerful for my suburban back yard.

The cocking effort and firing behavior were of course stout, but manageable. I mostly shoot lower-powered older springers, and was really pleasantly surprised by the 48 considering the power.

It's too heavy and bouncy to plink with all day, like you could with an R7 or such, but I remember it as fun to shoot and "minute of coke can" accurate.


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Chemclay
(@chemclay)
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 41
November 12, 2020 09:03:34  

Thank you. This is the type of info I'm looking for. 


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rich177
(@rich177)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 87
November 12, 2020 10:33:57  

I never owned one but had friends that did.  Many long years ago one fella tried to shoot Field target with one and he tried all kinds of things to make it shoot but we all still outshot him with our HW77 guns which were king at that time.  Another friend had a model 52 which was a beautiful rifle and I thought a great design.  The problem with that was you couldn't hit anything, and I do mean anything with it.  Now I will point out that both of those rifles were in .177 caliber and I expect they were too hot shooting for any accuracy.  If you want something on that platform I would suggest that you get one in .22 caliber because you get more reasonable pellet speeds with the accuracy the guys above describe.  If you want one in .177 I would think about de-tuning it, otherwise they are pretty hot in that caliber.  Hector uses de-tuned or perhaps I should say re-tuned RWS guns and does pretty well with them.

 


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stevevines
(@stevevines)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 204
November 12, 2020 18:34:53  

Great guns - love the sidecocking feature - very "medieval" with the ratcheting upon cocking -

Had one for years, ended up finding out it was originally owned by tony / trojan1994 of new ag on the Hershey box fame on the old Yellow -

Powerful, accurate, yes, a tadd heavy, but easy to install traditional sling studs.

2007 0602GamoHunter0002 1

Also owned a 52 in .25 - she had a rare glossy finish stock, and shot 19 gr. Webley Mosquitos in the low 740's -

Never should have sold it, but it funded a ft stock lol -

BenjiAS392Diana25015

 

You could do a lot worse than a 48. A LOT!


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boscoebrea
(@boscoebrea)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 280
November 13, 2020 18:43:22  

Have 52in .22,My thinking=bigger rifle needs at least.22 cal.cocking effort=some,accuarcy great,power,great.

Needs the .10 or 20 "inclined" scope mount,needs a strong springer scope.

  A powerful accurate sort-of-heavy side lever springer.

  I like my R-9 better....the 52 is a most powerful springer....

Bottom line get the 48 if you are not of smaller size and get a good deal...it is a true powerful and accurate springer.


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liveliner
(@liveliner)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 9
November 14, 2020 11:38:52  

My Diana 52 in .177 is very accurate shooting CPL's at 820fps. Mine was tuned about 10 yrs ago by Russ Best and was one of my first air rifles. Same as a 48 with a fancier stock. I dont use it much as it is a bit loud for my neighbor situation. Took it out the other day for chipmunk control. First time in 5yrs. Took the munk out at 30yd with  Beeman FTS 7.9 pellet that I usually use with my R-7. Stayed with the FTS and took out /several more. Still accurate but relegated to window sill shooting due to the heft & report compared to ny tuned R-7.

 


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daveshoot
(@daveshoot)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 107
November 15, 2020 22:46:35  

I had one in .20 cal... it was unmarked for cal and might have been a RichinMich rebarrel or rebore. Either way, it was damned good, and nearly one of a kind. Sold because it was heavy and to fund something else, always been a little sorry about that. Loved the side action, great for shooting prone. I would buy it back if the guy still has it.


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JW652
(@jw652)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 90
November 16, 2020 05:41:28  

   They are accurate. Saw Mark Plough win the AAFTA spring gun Nationals in about 1990 with his 48. Iirc, only two shooters in the pcp division bested him.


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Chemclay
(@chemclay)
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 41
November 16, 2020 10:52:20  

I know at times my questions appear to be going in circles, but I'm having a hard time deciding on a magnum springer(no opportunity to shoot these guns). So, does the Sig asp20 .22 shoot similarly to the RWS 48?


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 990
November 16, 2020 11:10:19  

May I please ask, other than the sledge system, what are the differences between the 48 and 54?

Part of why I'm asking, a member mentioned having a neglected 48 and I got all excited before remembering that 48≠54. Duh.

 

That could mean the older models, or new models, whichever you'd like to address.

Personally, I'm curious about the more vintage models.

 

Posted by: @liveliner

Relegated to window sill shooting due to the report compared to ny tuned R-7.

Slap an LDC on it. You'll be pleasantly surprised.


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 560
November 16, 2020 13:28:32  
Posted by: @gratewhitehuntr

May I please ask, other than the sledge system, what are the differences between the 48 and 54?

Part of why I'm asking, a member mentioned having a neglected 48 and I got all excited before remembering that 48≠54. Duh. 

 

The stock is different also, the LOP is longer and the stock is a bit "hefty".

48's are about 1" shorter in all senses (LOP, OAL), and lighter by about 1/2 #.

An "old and neglected" 48 might be a good idea, because you can actually drop in a T06 trigger and piston with a new spring and guide and you would be completely up to date.

 

😉

 

 

HTH

 

 

 

HM

 


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 502
November 16, 2020 16:59:33  

Many years ago, I had a .177 B21, which was a Chinese clone of the Diana 48.  Back then, the Chinese thought it was cheaper to just make a solid 3/4" barrel, rather than go to the trouble of making a barrel sleeve.  As it came to me, (from James Kitching, father of this forum,) it was a beast.  I invested more than I paid for the gun in a Maccari seal and spring-and-guide kit designed to slightly de-tune an RWS 48.  Back then, I didn't have a chrony, but that gun, with that thick-as-your wrist barrel, was one hell of an accurate shooter.


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Sicumj
(@sicumj)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 3
November 20, 2020 00:47:05  

I have owned a 48, 52 and 54.  54 was the most acurate and the 48 was my favorite to shoot.  It shot well with aperture sights.  I loved shooting steel with the 48, really cracks the steel. Best caliber is 22 in my opinion.


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Desert Silver
(@desert-silver)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 14
November 25, 2020 13:03:52  

I've had my.177 m48 since 1992. I bought it from beemans used. It was made in 1987 and has been my only air rifle until about 2years ago when I got into pcps. It still had the original spring in it up until about 2 years ago when I installed a vortec kit. It's the one rifle I will never sell. I can shoot it pretty good even though I don't use the artliery hold. I think I can get a 2" group at 40 yards with some hn 10.65 grain cudas. 


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Frank in Fairfield
(@frank-in-fairfield)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 153
December 3, 2020 11:31:18  

I had a 48, .177, tack-driver but...too short or me.

Replaced it with a 52 (one inch longer stock).

Much better.


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