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(@blowgun)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 38
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Do Gamo air rifles have a bad reputation? They're never mentioned on this forum. I'm looking at the Gamo extreme pro in 22 caliber. It has a lot of power (Gamo claims) so it can shoot heavy pallets, and it looks like it has a built-in suppressor on the end of the barrel, and it's a gas piston. But the price is low which makes me think that there's probably something wrong with the rifle. What do you guys say?


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(@marflow)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1127
 

i have some Gamo products, the old R-77 pistol , a Compact and the newer PR-776 pistol and all are fine shooters 

would i ever tell you to go buy a Gamo product, well NO and the why is they won't help the hobbyist

they will not sell part to us, maybe a seal or two but nothing much of anything else 

so any company that will not offer support to the customers should be avoided 

just imagine if Crosman had the same service or  Daisy but Umarex is about the same when it comes to parts 

and there are other but that for another thread 

there thinking is send us the gun and we will fix it, you know we need the work and the money 

so i get my parts from Spain for Gamo, just think about it you can get service from Spain but not from here in the states 

just my opinion 

take care 

mike


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Septicdeath
(@septicdeath)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 301
 

Like all pellet guns. There are some of them that might be a lemon. But most of them perform as expected. 


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(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 542
 

I have no experience with recent Gamo products, but I own a Hunter 440 from, I'm guessing the late 80's, early 90's.  It was oversprung when I got it, but I tuned it down by removing the rear spring spacer, and installing a JM Merlin spring.  It's actually one of my favorite guns, and it shoots a very smooth 770 fps with 7.9gr pellets.  Very easy to cock, due to the long arc.  I've also owned a few Compact pistols, which are remarkable.  I also had a Gamo Survival folding-stock break-barrel, and an AF-10 pistol.  But my favorite vintage Gamo is my Model 68 breakbarrel repeater.  Tubular magazine that sits atop the comp tube.  Just cock and shoot, it loads itself.

Gamo used to make some really nice guns, but I fear they have succumbed to the big box marketing appeal of max fps.

 


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(@blowgun)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 38
Topic starter  

Marflow, septic, Jiminy, thanks for the input. I do like the specs of that rifle, and I'm stuck with lthe lower priced guns, and for a long time I've wanted one with more power than my 177. What I really want is a 25 gas piston with a built-in moderator or shroud of some kind. In CA the only way to own any kind of noise suppressor is if it's built into the barrel of the gun by the factory.


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RockDoc65
(@rockdoc65)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 104
 

I have to speak up when I see threads like this. Look at higher quality USED guns. I just paid about $275 for a very clean Beeman R9, (HW95.) Well, let me explain. It wasn't a straight-up deal. I paid almost $400 for the gun and with shipping and PayPal fees it was almost $450 but it came with a scope that I sold for over $200. Once I paid for shipping on my end and did the math, the rifle came to somewhere round $275. Maybe I'm just lucky, maybe not. I'd at least look around. You couldn't give me a Gamo* (or a Crosman for that matter.) Well you could give it to me but I'd trade it for pellets before even opening the box. 

*Before you call me an airgun snob, let me point out, I'm allergic to plastic.


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(@boscoebrea)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 292
 

You could give my either,especally a Crossman CO2 or PCP pistol.

 I have an old Gamo Black Panther,put a better trigger in it and was good to go,it is an accurate springer....I got a R-9 of course it is a lot better springer...Buying a used better quality springer is good advice,

  I got a BSA gas piston pellet rifle,powerful and pretty,but not any better than a good springer.....

  Gamo,Hansan and the lot have some good pellet rifles     for the price.

 So yes you maybe able to get a Gamo to fit your needs and yes many people like them     for the price....

  Stay in the game long enough and you will be getting something made in England or Germany......

Another thing about power=FPS,,too much and you will lose accuracy.

  Better to be an accurate shooter than a power shooter,,,like so what 1200fps does not mean anything,just a number that catches rookies off base,  LOL  .

  


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(@nced)
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 99
 
Posted by: @blowgun

Do Gamo air rifles have a bad reputation? They're never mentioned on this forum. I'm looking at the Gamo extreme pro in 22 caliber. It has a lot of power (Gamo claims) so it can shoot heavy pallets, and it looks like it has a built-in suppressor on the end of the barrel, and it's a gas piston. But the price is low which makes me think that there's probably something wrong with the rifle. What do you guys say?

I have limited Gamo experience, however it was disappointing.

Decades ago I started with Beeman r9 springers and decided to see if I could buy a cheap springer and make it a good shooter. My first project was to buy a .177 Crosman Quest 1000 and found that the trigger and accuracy was poor compared to my R9s. I did a home tune on the Quest and found that i was able to reduce the 30 yard group size from 1 1/2"ctc to a "can rolling only" 1 1/4" ctc accuracy. The Crosman Quest was a Chinese Gamo220 knockoff so I was wondering if a REAL Gamo would be more accurate.

After a while I found that there was a Gamo440 on sale for about $100 (a few decades ago) so I ordered one. At first I was satisfied with the fit and finish of the "real Gamo" but due to the poor accuracy along with poor trigger, rough cocking and excessive twang I decided to do some home tuning. With a snug fitting spring guide I was able to get the twang down to tolerable levels", however I didn't solve the "bumpity bumpity" cocking action as the foot of the cocking lever slipped over the spring coils. I was able to get the awful trigger to acceptable with a trigger insert yet the 30 yard accuracy was still no better than 1"ctc like the Quest. I ended up "landfilling" both the Quest and the Gamo440 never to look back.

In contrast I later bought two Chinese B3s from a Cummins Truckload sale and cobbled together the two into an adequately accurate springer. Here are a couple groups shot with the home tuned B3.............

25 yards with factory iron sights..........

 

25 yards using a 6x Burris Compact scope that cost 3x more than both B3s together...........

 

I was surprised by the accuracy of the Chinese B3 vs the Gamo440 because the bore of the Gamo was nicely finished whereas the bore of the B3s were "rough as a corn cob".


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(@blowgun)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 38
Topic starter  
Posted by: @boscoebrea

You could give my either,especally a Crossman CO2 or PCP pistol.

 I have an old Gamo Black Panther,put a better trigger in it and was good to go,it is an accurate springer....I got a R-9 of course it is a lot better springer...Buying a used better quality springer is good advice,

  I got a BSA gas piston pellet rifle,powerful and pretty,but not any better than a good springer.....

  Gamo,Hansan and the lot have some good pellet rifles     for the price.

 So yes you maybe able to get a Gamo to fit your needs and yes many people like them     for the price....

  Stay in the game long enough and you will be getting something made in England or Germany......

Another thing about power=FPS,,too much and you will lose accuracy.

  Better to be an accurate shooter than a power shooter,,,like so what 1200fps does not mean anything,just a number that catches rookies off base,  LOL  .

  

What I've always figured is that the thing to do is to reduce a ridiculously high FPS to around 700 to 850 FPS by finding the right pellet weight. To my thinking that is the only way to experiment and find out the rifle's inherent accuracy (the gun "liking" a certain pellet). Of course shooting skills have nothing to do with a guns inherent accuracy, except to merely "approach" perfection in hold squeeze and follow through. You guys who can put hole in hole at 40 yards have my sincere admiration.


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(@nced)
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 99
 

@blowgun

"reduce a ridiculously high FPS to around 700 to 850 FPS"

In general I agree with your statement since it's easier to shoot a springer accurately if it doesn't "jump around" as much and I currently have my .177 R9 and HW95 tuned to shoot 7.9 grain CPLs at around 850fps. The current scopes I use have "dotted style reticles" so there are multiple aiming points which is beneficial for loopier trajectories, plus the lower velocities in a piston gun are less stressful to "scope innerds"............

Dotted style reticles...........

 

There have been exceptions to the "700-850fps" criteria for me . For my "all purpose springers" I found that 7.9 grain velocities below 750fps weren't especially useful for squirrel hunting in the West Virginia woods unless all shots were taken at close range due to the loopy trajectory. I used to tune my .177 R9s to shoot 7.9 grain CPLs @ around 910fps with good accuracy and I found my R9 tuned to shoot CPLs at 910 fps and using a 30 yard zero would give a "close zero" of about 16 yards and a "far zero" at 30 yards. Using the 4-16x40 Bushnell Elite 4200 for shooting hunter class field target with the standard duplex reticle the "tip of the lower post" would be on at both 10 yards and 50 yards. For the 55 yard target killzones  I would put the "tip of the lower post" at 12 o'clock on the killzone to knock the target down. For the intermediate distances the killzone would be "bracketed" between the crosshair and the tip of the lower post. Using a similar setup I even shot a pretty good hunter class score knocking down almost 89% of the targets..........

 

Using the same scope with my HW77 that was tuned to shoot 7.9 grain CPLs at 930fps (tad over 15fpe) I took 4th place in a National FT match where the first year the hunter class was added both PCPs and piston guns in the same class. There were 17 hunter class shooters and out of the 17 only 5 were shooting piston guns........

 

Here are two 50 yard groups shot using the same scope when testing out a "chopped and choked" .177 R1 barrel on my R9 after swapping out the .20 barrel that came with the gun. LOL, both the .20 cal and a .22 cal barrel was sold after shooting this..............

 

I've been tuning my .177 springers to shoot 7.9 grain pellets at about 850fps for years after using "dot style reticles" and also shot some pretty good groups with that setup........

 


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RedFeather
(@redfeather)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 138
 

Gamo's fit a certain niche, mostly people who don't want to fiddle with a gun, just use it for informal shooting, be it on paper or real rats. I know one shooter who said that, although Gamo won't sell parts (aside from a seal, etc), he's had good luck with customer service. He's returned one gun, gotten a second which had issues, then a third which was fine. No questions asked and they paid the freight both ways. The older Gamo's such as the 220 440 Shadow 1000 and 880 are decent guns, easy to work on and they take the "gold" triggers. I'm not sure about the big 33mm bare steel barreled  break barrel they are currebtky listing but it looks a lot like an earlier iteration of the Hurricane. But those are specialty guns being uber-magnums. So I'm not promoting Gamo's. Just saying they serve a purpose at a price point. That said, so do Diana 34 knockoffs such as the Xisico 25 and Ruger Airhawk, which I'd favor due to more kits available, lots less plastic and a proven platform.  Guess it all boils down to how much to spend and what to do with it?


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(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 407
 

Mostly forgotten and abandoned Gamo.

 

From before the BSA/Gamo union, but can find them with Daisy import stamps.

 

(Guess technically it’s a “European” rifle...Spain still being part of Europe.)

 

 

They tried a SSP match rifle. Unique piston system, no parts available, no one is willing to fix them... because of that parts situation.

 

STAY AWAY from the Gamo 126…..there is no easy fix, no seals, no anything to fix a dead one. This one might be one of the few still alive, and I had to buy a “junker” to cannibalize to do that.

 

[url= https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51103182102_c0105fd0c5_o.jp g" target="_blank">https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51103182102_c0105fd0c5_o.jp g"/> [/img][/url][url= https://flic.kr/p/2kRPaCA]DSCF0786[/url] by [url= https://www.flickr.com/photos/144930793@N07/]Robert Dean[/url], on Flickr

 

 

DID make me change my mind-set about Gamo...they could make a really good rifle...they just could not stick with it when they did or supply needed parts for such a low-selling air rifle.

 

 

Overall….the Gamo/BSA connection has been a plus for the GAMO PCP name brand...has NOT done too much for the GAMO springers. Are definitely better than they once were, but concentrate on “cheap n fast” mass marketing.


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RedFeather
(@redfeather)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 138
 

The BSA takeover did give them the original Hurricane (made and assembled in GB) and the CFX based on the Superstar. The target rifles were unique and that dampening system is what made them a real orphan gun. Other target rifles from the time like the Diana GISS models are more easily repaired with seals. I don't know how many Gamo's were sold or where they fit in the match rifles back then but I can see why Gamo does not have a back inventory of parts. 


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