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Does anyone here have experience with the Corbin S Press?  

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efrey
(@efrey)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 14
August 3, 2020 19:16:13  

I’m toying with the idea of swaging my own ammunition and would like feedback on this press and dies before I go off the deep end. Thanks in advance! 


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efrey
(@efrey)
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August 3, 2020 19:30:54  


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 4, 2020 11:42:02  
Posted by: @efrey

I’m toying with the idea of swaging my own ammunition and would like feedback on this press and dies before I go off the deep end. Thanks in advance! 

Corbin presses are good tools, they are made to make slugs, not pellets.

You will need a CLOSE fit between slug diameter and bore diameter.

For small to medium bores (0.177" to 0.25") you can do with a stout reloading press, the old RCBS presses are good enough, no need for the specialized Corbin S Press, unless you wanted to later go into higher calibers. Do NOT try using a Lee reloading press for this.

Slugs work well in PCP's, so if you shoot spring guns, then you're better off not taking the dive.

Of all the designs, the hollow base (cup or dish), dual diameter slug is what works best in PCP's.

IF you are thinking of larger calibers then there are certain principles that apply to sub-sonic projectiles that could mean a vast improvement, but you will then need a 5 dies set and the S press.

Swaging is a science, an art and a hobby all  by itself. It is a lot of fun and allows you to tailor the ammo to the task at hand.

HTH!

 

image

 

 

 

 

HM


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efrey
(@efrey)
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August 4, 2020 17:24:42  

@hector-j-medina-g, thank you so much for your reply. Your words come with authority and I appreciate them.

Yes, I’m looking at making slugs for calibers from .22 through .30 (or perhaps even .357 in the future). I’m planning on retiring soon and am hoping for more time with my hobbies. It does seem like it could turn into a hobby in and of itself, though! 🙄

I was looking at their smooth ogive slug dies with adjustable weights being very attractive to me. It seems from the video above as if once you get it set, it’s just one stroke of the handle to make one slug, negating the need for five set dies. Is this your experience, Hector? 


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 4, 2020 19:37:50  

The compound leverage arrangement on my Lee press spontaneously tweaked while reading Hector's post!

I've not owned every brand of press, of the ones I have owned, these old Lymans stand out for robustness.

I suppose you COULD break it... but this is in contrast to the Lee which is a challenge to NOT break during various procedures.

A prime use would be sizing .365 hard cast down to .358 via willpower and solid attachment to the table 😉

I'm NOT confident about swaging a .357 slug, if that were my goal, and to do it in a single stage, I'd go another way.

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/umkAAOSwTrFfDD37/s-l1600.jpg

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Lyman-Spartan-reloading-press/143656044610

These turret presses are 6 hole, slightly less robust.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Lyman-Turret-Press/274445538511

I hope this post is helpful, I've broke a couple presses LOL.

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RedFeather
(@redfeather)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 112
August 4, 2020 19:55:48  

GW, I don't have a Corbin set up but have considered one. I do have an older Rock Chucker but I'm not sure it would double as a stand-in. Those are about as stout as they come, too. I'm not sure if they have enough leverage to eliminate voids. If you have a wide array of slug shooters and IF you are very well-heeled, the Corbin has a lot to offer.  But you will need the lead wire feedstock. Again, not a poor man's setup.


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 4, 2020 21:37:31  

I should have started by stating that I have not swaged bullets, only broken presses.

Red is certainly correct that "O style presses" are stronger tham open types.

Amazingly, I found a pic of the Lyman turret next to the Rockchucker! Better leverage on the RCBS for sure.

To be clear, a turret wouldn't be my first choice, unless doing a multi-step process. Just a pic, whatever!

https://external-content.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse2.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DOIP.Jk0ekg3gPK9r5fxJIKU-sgHaE6%26pid%3DApi&f=1

A buddy of mine who made his own brass with forming dies used one made by CH Tool & Die. that looked like these.

The recent (but no active) listings I found were $150 and $200. These are known as "H style presses" and are strong as a mofo.

EDIT, I talked to Roy about this style press last night, he said that his original reason for buying it was to swage soft lead bullets around 40cal, and that it did fine. The rest of the convo is outside the scope of this thread, belongs on castboolits.com

https://media.nextechclassifieds.com/img/listings/lu/lukduke/listing_pic_1021858_1434839164.jpeg

 

 

https://www.shootersforum.com/attachments/chpress2-jpg.218/


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Tom Holland
(@xbowairsniper1200)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 72
August 4, 2020 21:42:46  

Efrey,

I have been playing with the Corbin setup for a while, and I have discovered several different things. 

First, the Corbin press is efficient and relatively easy to use.  It has a mechanical cam action to accomplish this,  unlike a standard reloading press.  Definitely not a cheap item, but in my opinion,  well worth it to to the ease of a swaging operation.  You can use a reloading press that is robust, as mentioned above,  but the drawback is that you'll need 2 dies, due to the different threads on the reloading press, compared to the threads on the Corbin press.   Being that a reloading press does not have the mechanical advantage that the Corbin press has, it must be a 2 die process for a reloading press. 

What I did, was, at the recommendation of Dave Corbin,  shoot a few pellets in my 2 popular Field Target guns, and recover them.  I sent these to Dave, and he told me what size the die should be for my application.   My size determined by him was .1775.  

I've found, for this particular caliber, something very interesting,  which is contrary to what Hector mentioned above. 

I made somewhere around 7-8000 pellets last year, and gave them away to anyone and everyone that wanted them to try and test.  This is what i found from feedback from shooters.

Seems that whatever weight, or nose shape slug (I have 3 nose shapes) that I made in a hollow base were horribly useless.  Useless in the way that almost everyone that tried them, could not get a group better than 6-8 inches at 30 yards.  Throwing them by hand would be more accurate. Change that hollow base to a flat base, different world.  Ragged one hole groups at 30 yds, just by changing the base.

The other thing that I noted, from feedback, was something that I did not, and would not expect.  Springer shooters, shooting various guns, in the 13-16 ft.lb range, found that the 2S hollowpoint,  at 15 grains, and a flat base, shot amazingly well.   I have one club member who shoots them out of a TX 200 at 14 ft lb or so, and it's a nail driver.   Who would figure?  I didn't. 

Here is a video I made a while back,  that can be found on my Field Target Tech Channel on U Tube. 

 

 

Hope this helps

Tom Holland 

Field Target Tech 


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 5, 2020 10:19:48  

A few comments here:

@ effrey.- Thanks for your kind words. Appreciated. If you are looking into those calibers, and if you are interested also in powder burners, then perhaps you should consider the larger of the hand presses by Corbin. It is a fantastic press that can also reload all the way to 0.50" BMG

Obviously, it is a more expensive piece of kit, but if you can get rid of all your reloading presses (except the semi-auto ones), then this press will do it all.

Now, I have been a Corbin customer since 1988, I have one of the limited stroke "Golden / Bronze" Mity Mite presses. Back then I lived in Mexico and there were simply no reloading components available (legally), so I started making my own bullets.

I went deep into the rabbit hole, creating bullets that far exceeded the Nosler Partition, and approached or equalled the Brenneke TUG. Great for any form of shooting, whether target, or hunting.

I explored all types of jackets, from the commercial ones, to ones made from copper tubing, and even turned from pure copper solid bar.

Then I got bored with firearms and returned to airguns, and explored the swaging of pellets. Coming form the ultra-high performance segment of PB's, I went directly to the more elaborate solution, which is a three die set so that you can swage the core (this becomes the pre-form), then swage the base and hollow point, and then swage the driving band and close the point, so that the BULK of the bullet rides the lands while only the driving band (skirt) becomes engraved. There are several reasons for this, but the MAIN one is efficiency. The less material you need to swage down to groove size, the less energy the projectile takes and the more energy is available for velocity.

I was also interested in hunting, and large, thin lipped Hollow Points are not doable in a single die set.

I would STRONGLY recommend buying the whole swaging books set from Corbin and reading them thoroughly BEFORE deciding what to buy.

There are MANY aspects to efficient and effective ballistic accuracy and precision, and ALL of them need to "Jive" (which, BTW rhymes with Ojive, regardless what NYC'ers say 😉 LOL) for the combination to be satisfactory. Without a proper "spec" of what you want your projectiles to do, you are setting yourself up for an expensive failure; count on investing between $1,000 and $3,000 in the hobby for the first caliber, if you want to consider later 9 mm's/0.357" bullets.

So, buy the books, read them, study them, ask questions, and then decide. One thing for sure, DON'T plan on doing it "by steps" delivery times are so long that you will be severely dsitressed. Dies are made one at a time, by hand, to exacting specs, they cannot be re-worked and are expensive. They are also fragile and delicate.

 

@RF.- RCBS stands for "Rock Chuck Bullet Swaging", the ORIGINAL intent of the RCBS press was to create 0.22" varmint bullets, making the jackets from 0.22" RF cases, and swaging the bullets. You can still do this. Corbin will make the proper dies and modern RF primers have less glass than the mixtures used 50 years ago, so the jacket forming punch suffers much less when the rim is swaged out. So, yes even the modern RCBS presses will swage up to 0.22" cal pure lead bullets.

Now, If the shooter already has casting equipment, there are adjustable lead core moulds that will cast cores 4 at a time within 2-3 grains of final weight, you do NOT NEED to buy the lead wire. Lead wire is useful and safe because you can be certain that the purity of the lead is what you need, but it is not absolutely necessary, if you take care in what you melt, where you melt it, and how you cast it. Corbin hand press dies are made for pure lead swaging. The use of jackets is only as a container for the lead and it is the lead pressure inside the jackets what keeps the two components together (though you can make welded cores also). If you splurge for the hydraulic, then you can swage copper and gilding metal and make your own jackets, but that is an order of magnitude bigger investment.

 

@ GWH.- It is not only a question of not breaking the press, it is a question of keeping the highest degree of precision and accuracy in the system. Even if a "C" press is robust enough to not break, swaging forces and strains are high enough to make them "flex" and then things are out of alignment, lateral forces crop up, and the extremely high precision and accuracy possible is lost. "O" and "H" presses are slightly better in that they do not loose concentricty nor alignment as easily, but the linkage is not there to make lots of bullets without considerable effort. Not worth your time to swage sub-par bullets just because it is a chore and you're tired of all the workout. It's like trying to shoot a round of FT or Silhouette with a Hatsan 135. As it is often said: "Work smarter, not harder"

 

@ Tom.- Your experience is correct and thanks for the video, though you should have mentioned that the pellets you are making are built for around 12 ft-lbs shooting. In this sense, the LENGTH of the pellet becomes critical because a little longer bullet will not stabilize in the approx 1/16" rifling at the 500 fps that a 15 grainer is allowed. Hollow base bullets will always be longer than flat based bullets and it is this length what prevents the bullets from stabilizing. 

I would be interested in seeing how any of your PCP's performs with the same setting that shoots your swaged pellet at WFTF levels while shooting the 0.177 Beast. Similar weight, different efficiency.

Lastly, the process to get Dave Corbin to suggest/set the die groove diameter correctly when using a choked barrel is to put the pellet into the middle of the barrel and then back it out. Otherwise he will think that you have too tight a bore and suggest a thinner projectile. This may or may not work, it is just safer to send Dave a couple of pellets that have not gone through the choke.

 

For all the friends.- Swaging and casting are interesting hobbies in and of themselves. They will allow you to look into the projectile at a degree of detail you never would have imagined. They do require time, patience and dedication.

As airgunenrs we have to think in different terms than established ballistics tell us, for example: the base is more important in the overall drag than the point. No flat base spitzer point will compete with a good 1 secant nose rebated boat-tail (RBT) when it comes to BC. That does not mean that all RBT's will shoot well out of your gun, rifling twist is of paramount importance when dealing with slugs (that have no aerodynamic stability) shot at subsonic velocities, so your barrel will need to achieve the right rotational speed at the possible MV's.

Last item: Be aware that even the WORST of slugs will have a BC that is 10 time better than the best waisted pellet. IF you shoot them, MAKE 10 TIMES SURER of your backstop and your trajectory. The carrying power of a slug is no joke, and its penetration isn't either. Where shooting pellets might be safe, slugs MAY NOT BE. Just because you are driving your slug with air does NOT mean they are less lethal.

 

Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

 

HM

EDIT:  I just watched the Air Tanks video. I am appalled. Do NOT let that video color your expectations of accuracy with swaged (or cast) projectiles. Good, well made, projectiles will be able to hold 1-2 MOA's in capable guns out to 1,000 yards in PB's and 200-250 yards in sufficiently powerful and properly built airguns.

 


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Tom Holland
(@xbowairsniper1200)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 72
August 5, 2020 16:53:13  

Hector, 

My NY accent is THAT bad!!! Haha....

I didn't go into detail when I mentioned about sending Dave the shot pellets (JSB'S), but I gave him a dozen shot through the choke,  inserted into the breech, and pushed in about 10 inches, then pushed back through the breech to recover them.  I then sent him the pellets, raw, out of the tin, not shot.  Didn't go into detail,  I was trying for the semi abbreviated version..

I also shot the redesigned Monsters,  Monsters, and the Beasts.   My slugs shot considerably better than all of the above,  the Beasts being the worse of the lot.

.

 

Tom Holland 

Field Target Tech 


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 5, 2020 17:20:15  

I've been convinced that this is a superior product, particularly when compared against a reloading press, even a strong one.

The price list did hurt my eyes... but the concentricity issue does seem much more important here vs reloading of metallic cartridges where the additional slop provided by a slotted shellholder and slotted ram face combine to speed the process.

 

Oh-jyve... say it with me Oh-jyve... Good! (Roy is from TN, say ahh-giv)

 

Tom, what was going on with the hollow based projectiles?


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Tom Holland
(@xbowairsniper1200)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 72
August 5, 2020 22:05:10  

Greatwhitehuntr,

In Hector's response to me in his post, he explains it well.

Tom Holland 

Field Target Tech 


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 6, 2020 10:33:27  
Posted by: @xbowairsniper1200

Hector, 

My NY accent is THAT bad!!! Haha....

I didn't go into detail when I mentioned about sending Dave the shot pellets (JSB'S), but I gave him a dozen shot through the choke,  inserted into the breech, and pushed in about 10 inches, then pushed back through the breech to recover them.  I then sent him the pellets, raw, out of the tin, not shot.  Didn't go into detail,  I was trying for the semi abbreviated version..

I also shot the redesigned Monsters,  Monsters, and the Beasts.   My slugs shot considerably better than all of the above,  the Beasts being the worse of the lot.

.

 

Tom Holland 

Field Target Tech 

Hello Tom

Thanks for the additional info. Yes you are right, that is the way to do it.

I fully understand that slugs are not for every barrel in the same way that long waisted pellets are not for every barrel, my ONLY point was about efficiency. I.E. how much energy from the HPA, or the spring, is taken by the pellet itself to conform to the barrel.

So, if you have tested them how much ME do the Beasts develop in your Steyr with the same settings as the similar weight Slugs?

THANKS!

 

 

 

 

 

HM


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Tom Holland
(@xbowairsniper1200)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 72
August 6, 2020 10:42:05  

Hector, 

Offhand, I'm pretty sure they were all pretty close.  I didn't have to adjust the muzzle velocity with a change of projectiles.   They were so close it was negligible. 

Tom Holland 

Field Target Tech 


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 6, 2020 10:52:09  

@xbowairsniper1200

Thanks, Tom!

 

Greatly appreciated.

 

 

HM


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 14, 2020 08:50:05  

My Lee single stage must have heard Hector typing, right on cue while resizing some hard-cast, I blew out the compound linkage on my "O" style (maybe a Challenger?)

I was looking for some parts, considered making the parts, but the old Lyman Spar-T was "psst! psst!" all in my ear. "Hey buddy... yeah you... I'm 50 years old and work like a charm. You really gonna fix that new junk?"

 

Dang... the old Lyman has a point... so I was looking at Midway (birthday pricing woot!) at a Lyman Brassmaster for $75... meh never cared for O style presses... how about vintage off ebay?

where's the beef

Pretty sure I'd need a big hammer, or maybe plasma, to break this.

pacific mine
pacific mine1
pacific mine2

This seller offered $96 delivered. It is in Arizona (no rust) chromed (no rust), came with extra goodies, and uses regular RCBS or Lee shellholders. Probably from 1970-ish, same age as the Lyman. Pacific made brands like Bair, and was bought out by Hornady.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Pacific-Super-Deluxe-Loading-Press-In-Miscellaneous/324251638960


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 17, 2020 09:55:50  
Posted by: @gratewhitehuntr

My Lee single stage must have heard Hector typing, right on cue while resizing some hard-cast, I blew out the compound linkage on my "O" style (maybe a Challenger?)

I was looking for some parts, considered making the parts, but the old Lyman Spar-T was "psst! psst!" all in my ear. "Hey buddy... yeah you... I'm 50 years old and work like a charm. You really gonna fix that new junk?"

 

Dang... the old Lyman has a point... so I was looking at Midway (birthday pricing woot!) at a Lyman Brassmaster for $75... meh never cared for O style presses... how about vintage off ebay?

where's the beef

Pretty sure I'd need a big hammer, or maybe plasma, to break this.

pacific mine
pacific mine1
pacific mine2

This seller offered $96 delivered. It is in Arizona (no rust) chromed (no rust), came with extra goodies, and uses regular RCBS or Lee shellholders. Probably from 1970-ish, same age as the Lyman. Pacific made brands like Bair, and was bought out by Hornady.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Pacific-Super-Deluxe-Loading-Press-In-Miscellaneous/324251638960

IIRC the problem with those "Pacific" presses was not so much the "C" architecture, but the fact that you had to pull UP to do the operations. Someone told me that it was done on purpose, so that not too much force could be put into the C.

Surely more than enough for any reloading, MAYBE swaging 0.177" and MAYBE 0.20" cal they COULD be marginally useful. Again, any flexure in the C will cause misalignemnt of the dies. While the Pro-Swage kits do offer SOME self alignment of the punch with the die depending on the precision/slack of the shell holder, it is not in the same league as the hemi/flat interfase of the old Mity Mite or the newer "S" presses.

IMHO Risking $300 to save $100 and not buying a proper O Frame or H Frame press is a decision that each shooter needs to make based on his / her risk propensity and depth of pockets.

Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

 

HM


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 17, 2020 10:25:48  
Posted by: @hector-j-medina-g

IIRC the problem with those "Pacific" presses was not so much the "C" architecture, but the fact that you had to pull UP to do the operations. Someone told me that it was done on purpose, so that not too much force could be put into the C.

HM

This can also be setup for downstroke, and it's my guess (based on period adverts available on ebay)  is that the upstroke was a fad, or marketing gimmick. I was actually gonna mention that, but didn't count on you being so darn discerning 😉

My post was mainly in relation to your comments that a Lee would not hold up, because they don't, and I know people are tempted to go the cheapest route. I know, because I did LOL, and it's a 12Lb fish on 8Lb test!

If I were swaging, I'd probably build my own H style, albeit without the ingenious linkage (maybe hydraulic or pneumatic, because lazy) Instead, I dislike o-style presses, they get in the way, IMHO. This press will be the official bullet sizing press, and the existing technology does not seem, to me, to offer any level of precision even nearly comparable to that provided by the press itself.

Let me repeat that differently. The method I currently use for bullet sizing including a driver into the shellholder slot of the ram, due to loose clearances in the afromentioned tooling, and the nature of cast bullets, induces runout far beyond that of the press yielding. For that reason, and in the context of info presented in this thread, thanks to the posters for educating me, I agree that a machine like the Corbin is superior for swaging.

I do not think that there will be appreciable flexure of this cupped C shape with the level of pressure I'm applying. Maybe I'll figure out how to throw a plunger indicator on it just to see. Now you have me curious!

Your dollar amounts don't make sense to me, based on any of the numbers presented. Did I risk $300? No, only $96. The Corbin appears to be 3X the sum of those, when set up. I'm not sure what you're saying, and I'm definitely not implying that this is anywhere in the ballpark of a Corbin. Your reply is appreciated, but it's not quite clear to me.

Please ELI5 thanks! Which unsuitable press might a person purchase for $300, and which $400 choice would be superior?


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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August 18, 2020 12:40:29  
Posted by: @gratewhitehuntr
Posted by: @hector-j-medina-g

IIRC the problem with those "Pacific" presses was not so much the "C" architecture, but the fact that you had to pull UP to do the operations. Someone told me that it was done on purpose, so that not too much force could be put into the C.

HM

This can also be setup for downstroke, and it's my guess (based on period adverts available on ebay)  is that the upstroke was a fad, or marketing gimmick. I was actually gonna mention that, but didn't count on you being so darn discerning 😉

My post was mainly in relation to your comments that a Lee would not hold up, because they don't, and I know people are tempted to go the cheapest route. I know, because I did LOL, and it's a 12Lb fish on 8Lb test!

If I were swaging, I'd probably build my own H style, albeit without the ingenious linkage (maybe hydraulic or pneumatic, because lazy) Instead, I dislike o-style presses, they get in the way, IMHO. This press will be the official bullet sizing press, and the existing technology does not seem, to me, to offer any level of precision even nearly comparable to that provided by the press itself.

Let me repeat that differently. The method I currently use for bullet sizing including a driver into the shellholder slot of the ram, due to loose clearances in the afromentioned tooling, and the nature of cast bullets, induces runout far beyond that of the press yielding. For that reason, and in the context of info presented in this thread, thanks to the posters for educating me, I agree that a machine like the Corbin is superior for swaging.

I do not think that there will be appreciable flexure of this cupped C shape with the level of pressure I'm applying. Maybe I'll figure out how to throw a plunger indicator on it just to see. Now you have me curious!

Your dollar amounts don't make sense to me, based on any of the numbers presented. Did I risk $300? No, only $96. The Corbin appears to be 3X the sum of those, when set up. I'm not sure what you're saying, and I'm definitely not implying that this is anywhere in the ballpark of a Corbin. Your reply is appreciated, but it's not quite clear to me.

Please ELI5 thanks! Which unsuitable press might a person purchase for $300, and which $400 choice would be superior?

Sorry if I caused confusion. Apologies.

Perhaps putting some examples would explain better what I believe:

If someone was "contemplating" getting their own swaging equipment for making slugs for airguns, he has two choices:

a) He/She buys an S press ($739) and the S press dies ($489 for the simpler variant), so the total is around $1,230 plus the initial supplies (lead wire or core moulds, lube, and assorted small items)

or

b) He/She buys a stout reloading press and some "Pro-Swage" dies: let's say between $100 and $300 for the press (we'll get into that later) and $289 for the die itself. So, with the BEST of alternative equipment, the shooter can start swaging with $589 worth of equipment.

Now, IMHO, the problem with trying to start swaging with $389 worth of equipment may come from the choice, not the price.

If the shooter was to choose to go "budget" and not invest in a Redding UltraMag press (a press I have used, know well, and would recommend, but costs around $300), he has a number of options. He can choose, within the Pacific vintage brand/market an "O" frame press like this one:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/TKB-pacific-multi-power-reloading-press/233678661469?hash=item366855675d:g:q0oAAOSwCa1fNEas  

or this one (that I also know well):

https://www.ebay.com/itm/TKB-pacific-multi-power-reloading-press/233678661469?hash=item366855675d:g:q0oAAOSwCa1fNEas  

or this one (similar to yours):

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pacific-SUPER-DELUXE-Heavy-Duty-Reloading-Press-Single-Stage-FREE-SHIPPING/133489266119?hash=item1f14948dc7:g:sEAAAOSwzqFfMEQ-

Difference in price is not as relevant as construction. The first two will prove useful, the last one is a risk; not saying it will not work, just leaves me with the doubt.

I understand people liking "C" presses, I just do not have ANY problem using "O" and "H" presses. But that is a question of personal liking.

Misalignment of the punch entering the die can create problems with the punches and a crooked punch removes a LOT of the "feel" needed to swage really good and consistent quality slugs. Specially in the larger calibers and small OD dies (like the Pro-Swage) and, so, having something that can align itself as much as possible (eliminating flexure) is highly desirable IMHO.

I am deeply sorry that I threw "bad Juju" on your Lee press. It was not my intention and I do use quite a lot of Lee equipment, their Challenger press CAN be modified to be very useful and stout, but unless you are outside the USA where getting this type of equipment is extremely hard, the difference in overall price/total effort is not worth it. Their bullet moulds and dies are as good as others that cost 2 and 3 times as much, so there is no objection to well priced equipment.

Hope I have made myself clear now and really do encourage any precision oriented person, like your goodself, to look seriously into swaging. It is a remarkable hobby and, in the same way that you only TRULY learn about ammunition by reloading, you only TRULY learn about external ballistics when you start making your OWN projectiles.

Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

 

HM

 

 


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 18, 2020 13:16:48  

Your first two links are the same, FYI. I'm curious to see what #2 should have been!

FWIW, Pacific did not appear to spray zinc primer before the color coat, and I believe that C style (like the one I bought) has been repainted. It might not matter to some, and the color displayed on my screen is darn close to the factory color. IF someone did want that C style (not sure why they would) put it in your cart and the seller will offer $84.99 after a couple days.

Lee dies are fine, I do have some Redding with the TiN sizer ring, but I'm not sure it matters, and I'm not sure what the TiN is backed with, so carbide is as good as any.

My actual reason for C style, I use 2 hands while depriming/resizing, to both inspect the case I'm about to put in, and check the pocket of the one just resized. It looks like a funky rave fluid dance, but it increases my speed, AND I SET OFF an un-struck primer once while resizing, now preferring to look before jamming a case into the die. POW! Scared the crap outta me, and the case self-deprimed WITH GUSTO!

I was gonna make a birthday-priced order at Midway, including Lee mold TL309-230-5R, because... off topic.... How does THAT look to swage? LOL!

Thank you for coming back to follow up, I'll probably edit after digesting your post, and clarification of that 2nd link.


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 517
August 18, 2020 18:01:47  

@gratewhitehuntr

 

OOooooopppsss, SORRY!, LOL!

 

Here you go, this SHOULD have been the second link:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Bonanza-Model-68-Reloading-Press-Gun-ammo-reloading-equipment/224058921716  

Bonanza produced some really nice equipment.

Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

 

HM


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Gratewhitehuntr
(@gratewhitehuntr)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 891
August 18, 2020 19:40:26  

Oh my...my my...

I was making mounting plates for all my presses today, so any press could use the same 4 holes tapped into a steel table.

There is an upgraded handle for the Pro 1000, and I swapped the original Pro 1000 handle onto the Lee Challenger... thinking about maaaaybe using it again... but now... now I'm going to save a plate until this seller replies to my question, and the Lee will become a spill-proof stand for the auto-disk measure.

This is too off-topic, even for me... https://pixeljoint.com/files/icons/captain_picard.gifset a course for PM system... ENGAGE! 

Someone save me!


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