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Beeman peep sights moving on FWB124  

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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 78
July 20, 2020 19:45:04  

Anyone use Loctite on their Beeman/Williams peep sights, if so what type? Or if you have any other advice let me know.

I can't get mine to stop moving back. Cleaned and degreased the rails and got the grub screws snug and clamped the flat head down but it still starts sliding back after about 10 shots. 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 663
July 20, 2020 20:12:53  
Posted by: @xmdx13x

Anyone use Loctite on their Beeman/Williams peep sights, if so what type? Or if you have any other advice let me know.

I can't get mine to stop moving back. Cleaned and degreased the rails and got the grub screws snug and clamped the flat head down but it still starts sliding back after about 10 shots. 

You're not the only one who's had a peep sight move. Some people use blue Loctite for it. Or Vibra Tite. But, I prefer to go another route.

You can use an Allen set screw as a stop pin. The screw doesn't have to be very large in diameter. You drill and tap a hole into the site platform to use it. And, by platform, I mean the horizontal plate on the sight.

Please note that the 124 doesn't have the standard, flat-bottomed hole for accepting a stop pin. It has some indentations. But, using them can be problematic, because they're shallow and round-bottomed. So, what you have to do is round off the bottom of the Allen screw to a convex shape that is fairly close to the concave shape of the indentations on the top of the 124 receiver.

Of course, those set screws are going to have to be pretty short. What I've done is use 2 hex nuts that match the threads. Tighten them together against each other on the screw, so that you've got something your drill chuck can grab a hold of. Then you can spin the screw while shaping the bottom with a file, or better yet a Dremel tool with bits.

When you go to install the screw, you some blue Loctite on it to hold it in place. It will never move again.

(Edit: My original post had a lot of mistakes in it. I'm sorry, I was busy wiin a project here, and I mostly didn't even proofread it. I just wrote what I wrote and pushed the save button. I've corrected most of the errors now).


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 78
July 21, 2020 10:44:31  

@ekmeister I tried to the Loctite earlier today. Will test it again tomorrow to see if it holds. I think I get what your saying. If this doesn't work I may send you a message to make sure I got it. Thanks

 


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 895
July 21, 2020 15:56:07  

Blue Loctite is used for screws that loosen up and if they are not loosening the the Loctite won't work, put a piece of black electrical tape at the mounting point and clamp to that 

will it would, i have no idea 

the Williams sights have little to any grabbing power, the 2 clamping screw are very small the top screw is only there to square it up if that is even possible 

but after looking at some picture it seem there was a special Williams sight for the 124 

if you go down in this post you will see a Beeman williams sigh and the has no side clamping parts but at least 1 set screw is visible 

https://forum.vintageairgunsgallery.com/postid/1559/

in any case good luck  i just went and grab a Beeman Aperture sight 5823 and there is 2.5mm of material 

so you could drill and tap for 3mm or 1/8 inch set screws and the set screws i would use are nylon 

BUT the set screws are going to push the sight up and in doing so it will tilt to the left, as is the nature with all of there side clamping sight Williams makes 

maybe a piece of double back panel tape 

just something to stop the slide

 

 


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Bob in WV
(@bob-in-wv)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 206
July 21, 2020 17:24:27  

Beeman made a scope stop that would probably keep that sight in place, if you could find one.


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Jim in SWMO
(@jim-in-swmo)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 267
July 21, 2020 18:15:07  

If the Loctite doesn't work try to find a scope stop to use like Bob in WV suggested. I'm using a Beeman scope stop to keep the Williams peep in place on my HW35K. Works great.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 895
July 21, 2020 19:08:41  

i saw a picture of the sight on a 124 and it was run to the back of the tube 

those old Beeman stops were about, i don't know 3/4 of an inch 

i have always thought you could just take a dovetail ring and cut the ring off and make a stop 

so if a stop on the back of the tube and the sight forward of that and that works 

i too would say do that 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

well i went on a quest for a scope stop and what i found was, lets say not much

Sun Optics makes-made one but they are not to be found SM-7005

of course Beeman made one and the only place i have seen them is on Ebay, there is one there right now but pricey 

Gamo made-makes one PA list NA but Gamo list at there site

https://gamousa.com/product/scope-stop/

so that is my leg work hope it helps 


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landmass
(@landmass)
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 5
July 22, 2020 03:48:50  

I think the old Beeman Professional Scope Stop, Part #5093, is still available.  They sold for $22.50 each in 1999 when ordered from Beeman.  They were obtained by Beeman from a German company called EAW, which is still in business.  A U.S. based dealer for EAW is New England Custom Gun Service, New Hampshire, which is also still in business and can be reached at 1-603-287-4836.  I ordered 8 of them in 2011 for $25 each and received them with no problem.  The stops are top of the line blued polished steel and work just fine.  I've got them mounted on all my Beeman and Weihrauch air guns with peep sights or scopes and have had no problems, even with my big .25 cal Beeman Kodiak.  I still have one with the packaging.  Good luck with solving your problem.

SAM 2039
SAM 2035
SAM 2040
SAM 2042
SAM 2043

 


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Beeman22
(@beeman22)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 111
July 22, 2020 11:04:13  

The scope stop can help, but you can't use the "Beeman Professional" one (or its modern equivalent) because the FWB rifles don't have holes for stop pins; rather, they use U-shaped grooves. 

If you read the excerpt above from the Beeman catalog, only 5092 can be used on the FWB rifles. It did not have a pin (basically equivalent to taking a dovetail ring and cutting off the ring as Marflow mentioned above.  Many folks tied using a 5093, which had a set screw that came down from the top, similar to many 11mm scope rings (you can see the screw all the way up in the pic above). Using that one meant you'd end up with a circular mark on the top of the action, and in many cases, it wasn't enough to stop the movement of a scope, and the set screw would end up ripping a nice groove in the top of the action. 


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 78
July 22, 2020 13:26:42  

Thanks for all the replies. Loctite didn't work so I added the electricians tape on the dovetail groves and put about 40 shots through it and hasn't moved. Will shot some more later today.

I may call New England AG as well, at $25-30 that's a good deal and I'll probably order some because I'll need them again at some point. Hopefully the electricians tape works though, I bought it with the intention of keeping it an open sight airgun.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 895
July 22, 2020 15:15:08  

the tape i think just messes up the metal to metal's ability to slide 

if it does it is a cheap fix 

if not i think the Gamo one would work, it seems to have good clamping and that pin you would not use 

 


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Jim in SWMO
(@jim-in-swmo)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 267
July 22, 2020 16:47:24  

@xmdx13x

With the light weight of a peep I wouldn't think you'd have any issues with the tape. I had wondered about friction tape like I've used in scope rings to keep the scope from shifting. But my experience with that has been that when it's good & hot out or if you're in direct sun it tends to get soft & gooey and things slide. But a peep is a lot lighter than a scope. 😉 


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Derrick
(@derrick)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 18
July 22, 2020 16:47:43  

I've had success on slipping sights/rings by degreasing everything, then applying a thin coat of carbon assembly paste.   Its found in bicycle shops and used to keep carbon fiber seatposts from slipping in carbon fiber frames.    The paste has a very fine grit in it to help friction lock parts together rather than rely on crushing amounts of torque.   

 


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 78
July 22, 2020 18:19:54  
Posted by: @derrick

I've had success on slipping sights/rings by degreasing everything, then applying a thin coat of carbon assembly paste.   Its found in bicycle shops and used to keep carbon fiber seatposts from slipping in carbon fiber frames.    The paste has a very fine grit in it to help friction lock parts together rather than rely on crushing amounts of torque.   

 

I have some carbon paste I use for the seat posts on my road bikes as well. I can give that a try. 

@marflow I have the Gamo stop but the heads on the screws stripped when I put it on my CFX. I barely put any force on them. I may end up stopping by the hardware store and replacing them. 

@Jim in SWMO I'm in South Texas so if I take it out in the next 3 months the tape getting hot will be an issue.  My plan was to take the it dove hunting with me and use it to shot squirrels while I waited, so the tape may be a short term solution. 

 

Again thanks for the replies and advise. 


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Derrick
(@derrick)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 18
July 22, 2020 18:57:09  

@xmdx13x,

I put a post up a while back about using carbon paste on a Hatsan/Webley Patriot.  Here's the link if anyone is interested:

http://anotherairgunblog.blogspot.com/2018/07/some-help-for-slipping-scope-mounts.html


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 464
July 22, 2020 20:36:30  

I've had good luck with this stuff on scope mounts and creeping peeps.

https://ezgrip.net/

[edit] A VERY little goes a long way when applied to the dovetail wedges of whatever you're mounting.

 


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Faucetguy
(@faucetguy)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 128
July 23, 2020 13:49:48  

I used vibratite only a tiny drop in each dovetail.  Works great.


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bf1956
(@bf1956)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 201
July 23, 2020 14:07:03  

Hmmm... will have to check mine, and that rear fac. sight what a piece shyt. for a classy air rifle and to have that horrible plastic base.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 895
July 23, 2020 15:48:12  

so i'm a show it if you mention it kind of guy so there is that thread lock 

https://www.vibra-tite.com/industries/firearms/

and it would work because it is a rubberize coat, for lack of a better word 

and could be used for many tasks, if your imagine works that why 


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Faucetguy
(@faucetguy)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 128
July 25, 2020 15:53:48  

I've also had good luck with toothpaste.  The ones that provide extra whitening have a good amount of grip.  And your gun smells minty fresh!

 


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xmdx13x
(@xmdx13x)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 78
July 26, 2020 11:35:09  

I ended up using some blue loctite on the rails. Haven't tested it yet though. Also was able to get the carbon paste for bikes. Thanks for the ideas. Was hoping to get out today before the remnants of Hanna hit but wasn't able to, I'll try to shot in the garage later. 


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MDriskill
(@mdriskill)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 172
July 27, 2020 12:59:11  

The instructions that come with the thing emphasize going back and forth between tightening the top screw, and the side ones. That's important - if the bar isn't absolutely flat up against the underside of the sight, it will have room to wriggle itself loose.

A trick that I've found to help, is to remove the two small grub screws that tighten the side dovetail bar, and carefully file the end that contacts the bar flat and smooth. Then when re-installing them, put a tiny dab of lithium grease, or something similar, on the end (the ends have a sharp bit of swarf as they come, and dig into the soft aluminum bar. Flattening and lubing them will let you apply more clamping tension).

Another thing that helps is to thoroughly de-grease the sight's dovetail edges and receiver grooves, and apply some old-fashioned rubber cement to them. A little extra "stik-um" never hurts!

 


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