The most overlooked...
 

The most overlooked piece of airgun equipment  

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sonnysan
(@sonnysan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 163
2018-08-29 20:21:05  

Is how to shoot properly!  I bought this book (well, this is an updated one) ages ago, and applied the principles to hunting offhand.  Ever since, I've never looked for a rest anywhere while in the field. 

Only shot two pellets today.  They found their home inside of two squirrels that took the room temperature challenge.  On top of that, I used a non-mildot reticle with a 25 year old springer!  I'd say one of the smartest investments I've ever made in airgunning.

http://www.championshooters.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&view=productdetails&virtuemart_product_id=643&virtuemart_category_id=9&Itemid=111

  


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Glenn in Texas
(@seeohtwo)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 12
2018-08-29 20:29:44  

"Room Temperature Challenge". I love it.

Glenn in Texas


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nervoustrigger
(@nervoustrigger)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 184
2018-08-29 20:50:18  

I don't know who coined the phrase but I heard it first on Active Self Protection's youtube channel.  If you like seeing armed citizens giving it to criminals, check them out.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsE_m2z1NrvF2ImeNWh84mw/videos


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functor
(@functor)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 41
2018-08-29 22:08:09  

That's because that "equipment" can only be bought with the hardest currency-- hours of honest practice. 

What are your thoughts on the use of artillery hold in shooting a springer offhand? 

 

 


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James D.
(@james-d)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 101
2018-08-29 22:52:53  

A chronograph, entire range of instrumentation, pellet sizers for each barrel.

This way you KNOW if you suck, pulled the shot, or something like the breech seal is not at it's optimal height.

Ask me how I know. I just spent 3 hours on phone with JIPA about how today, I learned a breech seal must be to the correct thousandths in height for top consistent speed, solid lock up & accuracy.

 

 


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sonnysan
(@sonnysan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 163
2018-08-29 23:07:03  

I've followed the book on breathing, hold, stance, follow through, etc. for 10m shooting.  It has paid off handsomely.  No stone has been unturned for airgun shooting in the book.  Once I applied the fundamentals from the most successful shooters on the planet, I got rid of the shooting sticks and other handicaps.  As for the artillery hold, I do not understand why you would add another element to make groups potentially more inconsistent - especially your hand.  Eliminate as many variables as possible.  I just put the gun in the rest grooves, and put my left hand to hold the butt in place.  The other is on the trigger.  Of course this is for sighting in a gun.  I go to a handgun range where there is no wind or other elements to affect the shot.  Once the gun is sighted, it is now time to put lead downrange on game.  Have not been let down in 30 years.        


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functor
(@functor)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 41
2018-08-29 23:17:46  

Thank you! Exactly my thoughts. The artillery hold has been eulogized so much in all the forums but I suspect that is because springers in the US are unusably powerful, and airgun shooters are unusually fond of bench shooting, or at least using some rest. 

I could never understand how anyone could have a stable hold in the standing position if the entire rifle was floating in the rear if one uses the "artillery hold". I shoot moderate powered spring guns (12-14 fpe) and with exactly the same hold (firm grip, solid cheekweld, firm contact with shoulder, forend on upturned fist) that I used to shoot target rifles with and it works just fine. Asked you because you are one of the rare posters here who actually shoots offhand by choice and posts about it!


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sonnysan
(@sonnysan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 163
2018-08-29 23:24:43  

The problem with the artillery hold offhand is due to the forearm hand being too far out on the stock.  You simply cannot keep the gun steady with a scoped rifle with any kind of significant weight.  Once I started shooting like a 10m shooter, I could even shoot a Theoben Dual Magnum with incredible accuracy.  That gun must weigh 10lbs. with a Bushnell 4200 on top of it. 


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functor
(@functor)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 41
2018-08-29 23:37:31  

I have to respectfully disagree. I think unless one tunes one's own guns-- which is a great thing to do and saves a lot of money provided one has the skill-- a pure shooter has much need of a chronograph. I mean you can darn well shoot the targets at appropriate distances and measure the drop without ballistic programmes. After all we aren't snipers shooting out to 1000 m. As for endless shot strings and ES and SD etc-- again if you are tuning it's useful data. When one is shooting I can't see how that information is useful. 

 


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functor
(@functor)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 41
2018-08-29 23:44:02  

10 lbs is a wonderful weight for target gun. I really don't understand the fascination for lighter than feather guns-- how can one be stable? I still like nose heavy 9.5-10.5 lb guns with traditional stock (Not the horribly obese FT styled stocks in vogue now), which "hang" in the front and are really easy to shoot from a target stance.  

However I have seen some British shooters shoot extremely well from that shotgun type hold where the support hand is pushed out. Heaven knows how they find a stable hold like that, but they certainly can shoot pretty well. 

I genuinely envy your collection of all these beautiful airguns which are out of production! I had to look up what's a Theoben dual magnum-- looks stunning! 


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