Some reference-qual...
 

Some reference-quality pics of an Anschutz 'Hakim Trainer' vintage air rifle  

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MattSpigner
(@mattspigner)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 10
2018-10-03 17:17:10  

This heavy (11 lbs.) Anschutz fixed-barrel, top-loader 'trainer' from my core collection is complete, in fine working condition, and is not only a fine shooter, but just exudes history and character. As knowledgeable collectors know, complete working ones in good condition are increasingly more difficult to come by, since there was only a limited one-time production run of 2800 units in 1954 by Anschutz (in Germany), which was then distributed to selected active troop detachments in 1955 by the Nasser Egyptian government, for use as rifle shooting trainers. Most were abused and destroyed in short order, way before making their way into collections in Europe or the States, since they were never assigned to individuals.

Note the characteristic skull / bone logo and Arabic narrative which is engraved into the  heavy steel receiver, which was specified by the Egyptian military.

This seriously over-engineered fixed barrel springer rifle is a surprisingly accurate and strong shooter, and closely approximates the dimensions, weight and balance of the Hakim, and other common military rifles of that period.  It is cocked by a lever mounted under the receiver ( see illustrative pics), causing the loading tap on the top of the breach to  automatically open.  The original front sight globe is included [...a detail that is frequently missing on many of these air rifles] There is a lot of history and literature associated with this undervalued piece of airgun and military history.  
 
'https://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2008/04/the-hakim-air-rifle-part-1/'

Hakim air rifle: Part 1

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James D.
(@james-d)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 101
2018-10-04 03:29:47  

Hello Matt,

  Jim Dingle here. Enjoyed your post & always a joy to read or hear your extensive vocabulary. You must of used 3 words I had to look up later in our last conversation, 8 years ago If I'm correct. 

  So, that sure is a beautiful specimen. Was just telling Dad about it. He's 76 & I described it as a Garandish type weight one could use as a melee weapon club bashing style if need be. Can you imagine? I got tired carrying my Savage 112 .22-250 with .875 bull, & I was a body builder (secret in fighting body builders is 🕺dancing. Don't let them get ahold of you for 3 minutes. Do not go to ground, & remember. Lactic acid is your friend if you're small & fast.) I had enormous 30  second bursts of strength but must rest then as can't even lift arms. Do NOT get in their face as they may likely use your own arm as a club. Point is Airguns are heavy. Yours, 11lbs (Garands=18lbs) most spring guns of magnum power, 9-12lbs not scoped.

  So, let's say I found a Hakim. I would not have the will power not to strip it of old finish, sand, steam, fill imperfections & put a nice new stain or natural hand rubbed finish. So Matt, my question is what's a fair price for beat up, (not saying yours is beat up)  Hakim? Then how much if refinished to a gorgeous state of condition? I suspect my refinish would look much better than the day it left the factory , ( though value most likely cut in 1/2) if everything I've seen on old military is standard. Build, make sure it goes boom, doesn't jam, throw in crate. My old unissued SKS was UGLY. I got a new stock & other bells & whistles & sold for $500 when I paid $140.00 it's barrel had a plug of hardened cosmoline. I can't help myself with wood. It cries make me pretty!

So that is a gorgeous piece. LOVE the deep Skull & Crossbones engraving. Out of the run, you know what # yours rolled out at?

 


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MattSpigner
(@mattspigner)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 10
2018-10-04 09:35:37  

Hi Jim,  

Good to hear from you!  I always enjoy your shared anecdotes and experiences.

As you know, I have always been a sucker for a beautiful piece of wood.  However, this brute [it subjectively feels comparable to a Garand in weight!] is a totally different animal.  Despite the 'marks of history' on it, this Anschutz's heavy dense wood stock is as robust and intact as the day it was manufactured, and I think it would be almost a 'crime' to sand out the 60+ years of history that are etched into it's surfaces.  My feeling is that such a labor of love would adversely impact associated historical significance, pride of ownership, and resale value for a large number of potential owners.

Anschutz definitely did a nice job on this 11 lb.+ battle rifle simulation in terms of shape, heft, and sighting characteristics.  The receiver and other metal components are robust and over-engineered.

All things being equal, I would hazard a guess that a refinished stock might, in fact, diminish it's market value.  Of significant importance would be the aesthetic and mechanical condition. Historically, working [albeit incomplete] Hakim's would go for around $400.  In the recent past, two incomplete, but supposedly working Hakim Trainers quickly sold on Internet sites for around $550.  I think that these shootable museum-worthy air rifles are still significantly undervalued.  I did not readily notice a serial number, but will take a closer look, and report back.

Be well!

Matt  (mattspigner@optonline.net)

 


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Bob in WV
(@bob-in-wv)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 127
2018-10-04 11:00:34  

I have seen several of these guns at airgun shows over the years for under $500.  I have a very nice one but I think it has been refinished.  I think I have had it priced at $550 at a few airgun shows.  It always draws conversation and I like that.  I guess I like to talk.  Mine is missing the protrusion on the top behind the sight.  It still shoots great and I have really enjoyed owning it the last 10 or 15 years.  Matt, you have a real nice all original Hakim.

 

Bob in WV


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James D.
(@james-d)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 101
2018-10-05 04:46:21  

Yes, I agree it's a solid piece & it's marks are history at this point. One thing I do know is you Matt know a good air gun when you see & fire one. I've been wanting a Diana Mauser and this is my first look at a Hakim. It is lovely & the fact that Anschutz made it is awesome. With such a low #, rarity in States, complete very good condition, I believe it's a steal. I find myself wondering what the troops thought of these. I'm also wondering how the Hakim stacked up against modern Spring guns. Any machinist/tuner could have those internals as good as new if not better with a Maccari, better guide, buttons & seals. If the bore is good it's a golden oldie for sure.


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MattSpigner
(@mattspigner)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 10
2018-10-05 08:58:28  

Thank you for taking the time to respond to this thread and your kind words.

My understanding is that the troops did not take these airguns seriously, and most were not only poorly maintained, but even fired with nails, and other hard miscellaneous objects, making short work of their internals and barrels.

Like all Anschutz products, the quality is top notch.  A robust fixed-barrelled springer, it is quite accurate and reasonably powerful, even with it's relatively unsophisticated trigger assembly.  The leather piston seals have survived remarkably well on many specimens, and can be quickly renewed, with a few drops of silicone-based lubricant, allowing for a velocity of approximately 550 fps, shooting mid-weight .22 pellets.

Matt


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