Pellet TESTING — at...
 

Pellet TESTING — at 100 yards?!  

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JungleShooter
(@jungleshooter)
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 49
2019-06-02 02:56:31  

OK, I know, it’s 2:30 in the morning on my side of the globe as I do this post, so maybe my brain is just at 50% and the answer to my question will be glaringly obvious after 7 hours of sleep....  🙃

Here it goes:

Why would I test which pellets my gun likes at 30 or 50 yards — if eventually all I want is one or two pellets that shoot well at all distances from 10 to 100 yards??

It seems that a pellet that groups well at 100y will also group well at 50y, but not necessarily the reverse is true. ¿Right?

So, as I’m getting ready for a full blown pellet test for a new gun (PCP), what can you recommend?  🙂 

Thanks!

Matthias


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pluric
(@pluric)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-06-02 08:16:09  

JSB, go to bed. 😉 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 448
2019-06-02 11:21:08  

Well, you do test at closer distances so you can eliminate the outright Duds. That's why you can even test at 10 or 20 yards first to eliminate the Duds, then take it out to 50 and do some more. Then finally at the farthest distances.

It's easier to see and reset targets at closer distances than to be looking at and walking back and forth between 100 yards. I don't know if you followed that but I think that's part of the answer. Why I test Springer pellets at 9 or 10 yards first then take the ones that look best and take them out further. Same principle.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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JungleShooter
(@jungleshooter)
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 49
2019-06-02 12:54:35  
Posted by: ekmeister

It's easier to see and reset targets at closer distances than to be looking at and walking back and forth between 100 yards.

Ed, that's a good point. It saves some walking if I get the duds out of the way first at 20 yards before moving to 100y.

But then once at 100y I'd need to shoot those again that did fine at 20y.... I could maybe save myself that step....  That's why I felt like starting out at the maximum distance that ultimately I want my pellets to perform.

 

Also, I'm not thinking of testing 20 or 30 pellets. I already have a preselection of 9 pellets (and some slugs) that have (a) the appropriate weight for the power of my gun,

(b) the are from quality brands, and

(c) they have a BC high enough for my purposes.

All I need is just one pellet and one slug that groups really well, nothing more.... 😀 

 

To cut down on walking and set up, I'd put up 20 target cards, and use a camera with a large magnification zoom to see and to document my shots.

 

I was even thinking to killing a target card and a chrono with one stone, aah, one pellet really, then I'd have some numbers to do my own BC calculations for my rifle-pellet combination in ChairGun for that rather large distance.

(Of course, that presupposes that I'll be grouping those pellets pretty well, not sure if my about-to-arrive rifle is up to that task at 100y, and even less sure if I'm up to it...!!  😆 )

 

Matthias


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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2019-06-02 13:12:32  
Posted by: JungleShooter
Posted by: ekmeister

It's easier to see and reset targets at closer distances than to be looking at and walking back and forth between 100 yards.

Ed, that's a good point. It saves some walking if I get the duds out of the way first at 20 yards before moving to 100y.

But then once at 100y I'd need to shoot those again that did fine at 20y.... I could maybe save myself that step....  That's why I felt like starting out at the maximum distance that ultimately I want my pellets to perform...

Matthias

I think you understood the point I was trying to make.  If you want to test all of them at 100 yards from the very start, of course that will work, too.  I was just trying to answer the initial question you asked, as to why you would shoot at a closer distance first.  I bet if I timed you with a stopwatch, doing it both ways, you'd register a shorter time for the close-then-far method.  And, I've personally looked at targets at very-far distances with high magnification spotting scopes, looking for the holes in the targets, and I find it both tedious and a cause of eye strain.

IIRC, forum member Yrrah has done a whole lot of long-range accuracy testing with a PCP, and even posted some nice videos in the past to show how he does it.  Search for some of his posts and you may find some useful tips--not the least of which is his 'table top pellet rolling test' (my term, not his) results for identifying the most consistent pellets in a tin to use for your testing.  It provides a more-definitive accuracy result for a given brand of pellet before you even start shooting, than simply shooting whatever pellets your fingers happen to land-on in a tin of pellets.  Said another way, even when shooting a high quality brand of pellets, not all the pellets in the tin are created equal.  His roll-the-pellets-first test (again, my term for the same test, not his) tends to level the playing field in that regard--your common sense will quickly grasp the reason for the test the first time you see how he does it.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 238
2019-06-02 19:50:02  

Am also of a mind to test at shorter range at home first just to weed out the ones that haven't got a chance at longer distances and to save range time.

 

Same thought as you...may find a great shooting 40 yard pellet that "goes stupid" and can't make a group at 80yards.....but so far, NONE that shot stupid at 40 yards suddenly faith-healed and shot great at 80.

 

Eventually you'll end up with a handful of "possible" pellets to test at longer ranges.  Some are likely to go stupid on you, but of the ones that shot great at shorter ranges, one or two are going to do well at longer ranges.

 

Just making the away from home range time more productive.


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pluric
(@pluric)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-06-02 21:51:16  

See if there is a local indoor gun range with a 100 yard tunnel. It's so nice to just push a button and have the target go to any distance you want. No walking and wind isn't a consideration. My son got me hooked on them for marking turrets for certain distances. 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 448
2019-06-02 22:58:16  

Well, first, the comment about wind accuracy errors, especially at long range, is very well placed.  If you DON'T have access to an indoor, wind-free range, don't even bother to do your testing until you have a day when the wind is very-calm or non-existent.  Around here, Houston area, I've noticed that mornings tend to be more calm, then the winds increase as the day progresses.  I think that's true in most places.

How do you know the wind is low/dead calm?  There are several methods that people use, but I've always liked driving stakes with a 'flag' attached into the ground along the path the pellet will be traveling on its way to the target.  Assuming your shooting range is close to your house, like in your backyard, you don't even need to walk outside to see what's going on.  Have that extra cup of coffee and see if the flags are flying.  If so, better wait until later, or another day.

Now, as to the pellet rolling test video by Yrrah, I don't like to tease someone and leave them hanging.  I went and found it.  See what you think.

Harry has other posts, also with video, about long range shooting.  I'll let you or someone else do the searching for those.

HTH.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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JungleShooter
(@jungleshooter)
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 49
2019-06-05 13:23:50  

Ed,

thanks a lot for the video of pellet rolling. That's genius, pretty cool idea!

Surfing YouTube I found another one from a FT channel, similar method:

 

Wind flags?  Check!  Got those since a few months ago.... -- that's something that I finally understood after playing around with ChairGun punching in difference scenarios:  WIND is our worst enemy, and the longer the ranges and the lower the power, the badder it gets!! 😡 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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2019-06-05 13:44:45  
Posted by: JungleShooter

Ed,

thanks a lot for the video of pellet rolling. That's genius, pretty cool idea!

Surfing YouTube I found another one from a FT channel, similar method: ...

My pleasure.  Who said obsessive compulsive behavior is a disorder?  Someone once told me, "Let's keep this in perspective.  You WANT your brain surgeon to have OCD".  But, you know, if you go around cleaning the inside of new envelopes before you can use them, that's over the top.  

 

Wind flags?  Check!  Got those since a few months ago.... -- that's something that I finally understood after playing around with ChairGun punching in difference scenarios:  WIND is our worst enemy, and the longer the ranges and the lower the power, the badder it gets!! 😡 

We're on the same page, but your English could use some polishing.  You should have said, "the worser it gets"--lol.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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chrisT
(@christ)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 17
2019-06-05 17:23:24  

 No,  the wind is your friend.  #1 reason Mirage.   Wind flags out to 100yds  all set at same height isn't going to tell you a lot need to set them in the apx trajectory path height wise, or use the local vegetation as indicators,even variable brightness affects your aim,  going to have a pretty good arc and  likely pass through different atmospheric densities in it's journey.   Also the surrounding lay of the land, trees bushes  and such will need to taken into consideration  as to thermal currents not just plain wind.

At any rate its hoot when you can get it all together.  ain't no expert but been at it long time


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 448
2019-06-05 18:13:23  

Learning how to shoot when the wind is blowing is going to be an asset for when you shoot in real world conditions, but not so much for initial testing to see which pellet is the most accurate.  Wind is going to affect accuracy, and could sabotage your test results.

Try to narrow down to the one or ones that shoot the best in still air, then you can test again when the wind is blowing to see which one is still good.  That gives you an idea of their wind resistance, which is useful.  Or...

Simply look up the online-available tables of BC's of the ones that looked the best in still air, and use the one with the highest BC.  BC is directly related to wind resistance, so it should come out on top.  Yes, you can actually test them all again when the wind is blowing.  But, if you try the best ones on a windy day, the one with the highest BC should come out on top--unless the results are so similar that only shooting them will reveal the true winner.

(Oh, go ahead, I learned how to ignore posting feuds a longgg time ago).

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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caninesinaction
(@caninesinaction)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 43
2019-06-09 05:21:48  

Good thread. Surprised that more members do not search for the body of work done by yrrah and others that were posted on the old yellow. Great stuff that answers most of the questions about pellet testing in all conditions. Thanks to all for another good discussion. Keeps me coming back 😀 


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