HW95/R9 Questions
 

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RockDoc65
(@rockdoc65)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 61
2019-09-20 22:26:51  

What's the trigger guard on the HW95 made of? Do they sell the "no-sights" version without the scope "package" deal? How is the Weihrauch branded scope? I'm trying to push myself off the fence.


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jkorny
(@jkorny)
Joined: 9 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-09-21 01:32:34  

The trigger guards on all my HW's are diecast metal. No idea on the sights as the only Beeman springer I have is a R6


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-09-21 03:30:15  
Posted by: @rockdoc65

What's the trigger guard on the HW95 made of? Do they sell the "no-sights" version without the scope "package" deal? How is the Weihrauch branded scope? I'm trying to push myself off the fence.

I don't know about a version without sights that doesn't have a scope, at least not here in the USA. I checked four sites just now and couldn't find one like that. If you don't want to use the package scope, why not by the version with sights, remove them, and install the ARH muzzle brake?  That would leave a few small holes on the top of the breech-block. If that bothers you, you can make one out of mild steel and cold blue it. Or, use a little black RTV in the holes. I just did one like that and you can barely notice it. The RTV will last forever.

This is the link I found to a Euro-site.  That appears to be a moderator on the front, not just a brake: 

https://www.theairguncentre.com/weihrauch-hw-95-k

But, as far as the trigger guard, it's some sort of steel, because it can be touched up with cold blue if it gets scratched. It appears to be cast (as opposed to forged), but it's not just stamped sheet metal.  And, it's not plastic like on some air guns.  It's plenty durable if that was your concern.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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Arch_E
(@arch_e)
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 9
2019-09-21 07:43:10  

My HW95 kit has the Weihrauch 3x9x40 scope. It is giving me excellent service, but I can only compare it to two other UTGs and two other CPs. I view it as a solid, quality scope!

 

Great kit!!!!

 

Arch_E


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josh3rd
(@josh3rd)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 113
2019-09-22 11:47:34  

dude, i think, IMO, that its nice to have open sights on a rifle.  one never knows when a scope takes a crap. then what are you going to do? if you're lucky, you have another rifle to shoot.  but anyway there are a plethora of scopes to choose from.  I say the hawke vantage is always a good option.  


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RockDoc65
(@rockdoc65)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 61
2019-09-23 12:06:09  

I'm very happy to hear that the trigger guard on the R9 is not plastic. I was very pleasantly surprised to hear that it's possibly steel. It's likely MIM which is the perfect application of that technology. The 1911 guys whinge on and on about MIM parts but for a trigger guard on an air rifle it's perfect.

As far as the sights are concerned I just prefer my rifles "clean." I get the whole "back-up iron sights" concept but then you better carry the tools to remove the failed scope or you can't realize the advantage. I don't think quick-release mounts will stay put on a springer.

I also had my suspicions that the Weihrauch branded scope might be pretty decent. I don't think H.W. and company would want to attach their name to a cheap "package deal" scope. This makes me wonder who made it. Now I'm even more curious about reticle and the "Made in..." stamp in the bottom.


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-09-23 13:15:15  

@rockdoc65

Don't take this as gospel please, but to me the trigger guard looks like it could be made of something called sintered metal. The thing is, I saw some of the stuff once, on something else, so I'm kind of working from memory and I never got it confirmed by anyone anywhere that's what the trigger guard is made of. It just reminds me of what I saw when I saw the sintered metal. And since I just did a Google search and found that sintered metals can be made of assorted things, including steel, I think there has to be steel in the trigger guard, because like I said, it can be touched up with cold blue.

Anyway, in working with more than 50 of those trigger guards over the years, I've never seen a single failure, or even anything close to it. So you don't have to worry about that.

I don't know what MIM is, so I'll have to do a little research on that. Maybe it's similar.

Edit: OK, I just did a Google search on MIM, and it says it's made from powder. I think I read that sintered metal is also made of powder, then heated under pressure to bond it together. So maybe they're similar, or maybe even the same stuff. This is not my area of expertise.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 302
2019-09-23 17:03:08  

@ekmeister

MIM is an acronym for Metal Injection Moulded.

You start with a paste and a mold, inject the paste (a mixture of your metal and a fusing agent/flux) into the mould (which needs to be oversized) and, under high pressure, the piece sets enough to be handled, then you bake it to almost the melting point of the metal you are using.

The piece shrinks to size, hardens and coalesces into a single unit.

Because of the way the process works, the pieces always have a hard "scale" that is beneficial to most parts.

It also happens that the parts do NOT loose some of the characteristics of injection moulded pieces (like sprues).

DIANA uses MIM for some trigger sear parts, but in our drop-tests, the trigger guard did not actually require the added cost.

In all my years (almost 20) working with airguns I have only seen ONE trigger guard fail, and that was because the owner used a "cowboy tight" torque spec on the trigger guard's screws.

HTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

HM


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-09-23 19:21:26  

@hector-j-medina-g

Well it's interesting to know they do not lose their characteristics. From what I can tell in comparing the two, there is some commonality between sintered metal and MIM parts. The source I used gave the nod of superiority to the latter by at least a little.

So, you've been tuning air guns for almost 20 years. You'll never guess. The first one I tuned for someone else was in either 1999, or 2000, right about 20 years ago. We appear to have that in common.

I wonder if you've ever had the same thought cross your mind that I have. Namely, that a tuning job hasn't been properly completed until you've cleaned up the rust from the places where you bled on the sharp edges of the metal.  Ouch, right?

Anyway, I was tuning my own springers before then, but about 20 years ago I started getting paid to do it for others. My very first job was tuning an RWS 54 for a dentist in Hawaii. He couldn't get anybody else to touch an RWS air gun at the time, on the mainland, and certainly not in Hawaii where there were no tuners. Word was from some other tuners that RWS just rifles weren't good enough that they could be improved, no matter what you did to them.  He had already been turned down for that exact reason by at least one of them. 

But, Dr. J. loved the job I did for him, and gave me a nice post on the old Straight Shooters forum.  (Not sure if it's still there).  I've I seem to remember that he paid as much for shipping it to and from Hawaii as he did for the tune itself. I shopped prices for him, but that was the best we could do--using air freight, that is.

Interestingly, he had just purchased an FX Tarantula PCP, and said he fell in love with that thing. He said his favorite pastime was shooting rats at the dump, LOL. I still remember his name very well, but wouldn't post it for confidentiality reasons. I wonder if he still shoots airguns.

As a footnote, when I say none of the other tuners wanted to touch RWS rifles, I'm not talkin about JM, as if to say that he couldn't have handled it.  To the best of my memory,  he had either stopped doing hands-on tuning by then, or just wasn't interested in that particular project for whatever reason. However, I did end up using his tuning kit for the job. So, there's my story of how all the fun began.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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Prairie Farmer
(@prairie-farmer)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 161
2019-09-23 20:51:17  

If I recall right, the triggers guards appear to be die cast aluminum.  I believe MIM has steered away from AL because of the sintering steps.  The HW guards are painted that have encountered.  I polish them up at times taking out the partings lines along the way.

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You can also spin the safety plunger in a drill press and shine it up on the end as shown.

View post on imgur.com

Prairie Farmer

 

Everybody gotta die sometime Red.


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 302
2019-09-24 11:23:32  

Ed.- I am sure most of us started with our own personal interest in airguns and leveraging the experience we obtained to do OPG's

MIM is a little more than sintering because of the fluxes used. The difference between MIM and sintering would be best explained as trying to forge-weld a steel ring/chain link with and without borax.
I know VERY few people nowadays would know the difference, but I hope that those with more rural backgrounds can find other analogies.

Keep well and shoot straight!

 

 

 

 

 

HM


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