Best scoped rifle t...
 

Best scoped rifle to replace Crosman 1400?  

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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-11 11:18:30  

Crosman 1400 has served me well @45yrs to control the Red Squirrel Menace, but aging eyes now require a scope.

Apparently the 1400 needs a 1/2” tube scope (4X20 or 4X32) -and after looking into availability/etc a new scoped rifle seems to be best option.

Want:

  • Good Quality (gun and scope)
  • Good accuracy and power for effective red squirrel population control
  • High Reliability / Long Life
  • Minimize maintenance / tweaking req'd.
  • Reasonable repair cost and replacement parts available if needed.

In summary:  need "grab and go" reliable replacement for the 1400 for when Enemy spotted.  Goal:  Fast 1-shot drop then put away till next victim.

Range considering:  Diana RWS 34 to Benjamin Marauder.  Will pay to get good quality, but don't want to pay a lot more than I need to.  There's an annual competition just down the road, therefore potential I'd test my skill at some point with the new gun (if this factors into any recommendations).

So many choices -any recommendations appreciated! 

THANKS

 

 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 408
2019-05-11 14:46:31  

Personally, I like the RWS 34 P with a Tasco 2.5 - 10 x 42 AO Varmint scope on top. The rifle has a black synthetic stock, which I like a lot  because it's pretty much weather proof and scratch proof.  But, if you prefer a wooden stock the same rifle is available with that, too. I think it cost just a little more.  I never buy a springer with the scope combo that is often offered, because the scope is usually cheap and breaks fairly fast.

You increase the 34's reliability a great deal by purchasing a $20 ARH spring.  While you're in there, it's a great idea to upgrade the factory lube job with some better lubes.  Just have someone install those for you if you don't know how. You don't need a full rifle tune or full tuning kit unless you want them.  A first stage adjustment screw is a nice addition with little cost or trouble if you get a T05 trigger.  If yours comes with the T06 trigger, it already has the second screw.

The 34 P, Tasco, and ARH combo are what I own in 22 caliber, and it's a really great setup. It will certainly handle squirrels out past 50 yards. Of course that kind of shooting take some good skill but practice will probably get you there. Just know that I'm a big fan of .22 caliber, but if you prefer. .177 caliber that will get the job done too.

While I do the spring  and lubricant work I described, and have worked on lots of rifles, this is not a sales pitch. There are guys here on the forum  who do their own work on their own springers. I'm sure one of them would be willing to volunteer to fix you up for the spring swap.

By the way oh, I'm not sure where you're getting that 1/2 inch tube reference. The smallest scope tube size I remember seeing are the 3/4 inch tubes that sometimes come on .22 rimfire or air rifles, and you wouldn't want to use one of those on a good springer-not strong enough these days. The Tasco has a 1 inch tube.

Here's a link to the rifle--places like Pyramid Air carry it, too:

https://www.amazon.com/RWS-Model-Caliber-Pellet-Airgun/dp/B001R67M3O

You'll need to get scope rings or possibly even a drooper mount to attach the scope to the rifle, but this should get you started.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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Doug Wall
(@doug-wall)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 103
2019-05-11 15:22:02  

You could probably get one of these scope mounts for your 1400, and put any scope you wanted on it.

https://www.amazon.com/Sun-Optics-USA-Airgun-Barrel/dp/B002KJ3CI6


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-11 15:47:48  

ekmeister, thanks for your reply. 

The referenced 1/2" tube scope was what experts at the local airgun show/shoot said was the OEM 1400 setup.  Google appeared to confirm that, and that adapting a different scope isn't a great idea.

Thanks for your recommendations for the RWS 34.  Agree regarding avoiding the gun/scope combo -aware that's strongly recommended by most.


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-11 15:54:43  

Doug, thanks for your reply.

A Crosman expert at the airgun show last summer told me adapting other scopes would not work.  He even walked around the show with me to look for a 1/2" tube scope.  He appeared to be highly regarded by other exhibitors, therefore I trust his advice.   

My conclusion was not to mess with the 1400, and instead get a good scoped setup.

 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 408
2019-05-11 16:17:25  
Posted by: squirrelshootin

ekmeister, thanks for your reply. 

The referenced 1/2" tube scope was what experts at the local airgun show/shoot said was the OEM 1400 setup.  Google appeared to confirm that, and that adapting a different scope isn't a great idea.

That rifle was around when I was a kid.  I saw them, think I shot one too, but didn't realize the scope was built with a half inch tube.  The ones I saw and shot didn't even have scopes IIRC, and I didn't know what you was recommended.  So, thanks for that info.  (A half inch tube--who'd a thunk it??).  

Besides, I read your post and didn't think a new scope for the 1400 was even on the table.  I thought you were looking for a whole new rig.  The scopes they put in the box with MSP's and CO2 guns in the old days--often with 3/4" tubes--pretty much predated the use of springers in the US, so they were never designed to take the abuse of 2-way recoil.  If something other than a Euro spring rifle is acceptable, I think you can still buy the QB78.  They would support a lesser scope.  Still, at about $70 inc/shipping, that Tasco I mentioned gives great performance on a medium recoil spring rifles at a very-reasonable post.  Just make sure you get remaining new stock.  The Tasco rep told me they've been changed, and I have no idea how they compare to the prior model that's been sold for more than 5 years.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 408
2019-05-11 16:29:52  

https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0000V2BLU

BTW, if you strictly want 4 power, you can do that.  Just set the power ring to 4x and leave it there.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-11 16:58:22  

Last summer, finding a scope for the 1400 was on the table and I went to the airgun show to find out what the scope options were. 

After the show and some follow-up research, determined scoping the 1400 wasn't the best option-

Therefore yes: my OP asks for recommendations for a new rig.  Not interested in CO2 guns, which apparently QB78 is.


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Doug Wall
(@doug-wall)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 103
2019-05-11 17:05:26  

I think that your Crosman "expert" was full of shmoo! Nobody ever made 1/2" tube scopes. The originals sold by Crosman to go on the guns were 3/4" tubes. Have a Crosman 140, (I got it around 1963) which pre-dates the 1400, and I had one of the original 4x15, 3/4" tube scopes on it. It currently has a 4x32, 1" tube scope on it, and it works fine.


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Bob in WV
(@bob-in-wv)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 115
2019-05-11 20:44:53  

I am with Doug on this matter.  It is not hard to put a one inch tube scope on a 1400.  Ed's advice for the Tasco scope is good too.  I have had several of them and they are a good scope for the money.  The Dian 34 is a great gun but it won't be near as easy to shoot as your trusty 1400.  I would buy the mount from the link above and the Tasco scope and give it a try.  If you don't like it, then buy the 34 and put the Tasco on it.

Good luck,

Bob in WV


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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2019-05-11 21:45:11  
Posted by: Bob in WV

I am with Doug on this matter.  It is not hard to put a one inch tube scope on a 1400.  Ed's advice for the Tasco scope is good too.  I have had several of them and they are a good scope for the money.  The Dian 34 is a great gun but it won't be near as easy to shoot as your trusty 1400.  I would buy the mount from the link above and the Tasco scope and give it a try.  If you don't like it, then buy the 34 and put the Tasco on it.

Good luck,

Bob in WV

I just want to add that when I mentioned the Tasco scope, I was talking about other guns because I really don't know the 1400 at all. It seems you do. I remember some MSP guns like maybe the Benjamin Sheridan guns had to have holes drilled and tapped for a special kind of scope mount that didn't get in the way of the cocking process as I remember. So I hope he'll take your advice and that of others who really know that rifle.  I had a Crosman 2200 with a dovetail mount for any scope you wanted to use, but it came along a lot later then the 1400 and was an entirely different animal.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 586
2019-05-12 01:00:35  

what I would do is mount a weaver picatinny scope base using the screw hole that the rear sight uses and get a long eye relief scope, scout style scope

something for a TC encore barrel might have the right contour 2 screws would hold it on and don't use the scope as a handle

or a Hammerli 850 with a 2 x 12gr adapter with a scope of your choice

Mike


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fivestar45
(@fivestar45)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 26
2019-05-12 11:41:38  

From what I understand, you are willing to go with a clean sheet of paper. That said I'd go with one of the Crosman PCP's. Crosman customer service and parts availability are in my opinion way ahead of all of the others. They are reasonably uncomplicated so most home repairs are possible. There is a start up initial cost jump for PCP's as you need to buy a source to fill them. My off hand guess for your purposes...check out the New Gen II Fortitude which will be available any day now.

 


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-12 12:05:52  
Posted by: fivestar45

From what I understand, you are willing to go with a clean sheet of paper. That said I'd go with one of the Crosman PCP's. Crosman customer service and parts availability are in my opinion way ahead of all of the others. They are reasonably uncomplicated so most home repairs are possible. There is a start up initial cost jump for PCP's as you need to buy a source to fill them. My off hand guess for your purposes...check out the New Gen II Fortitude which will be available any day now.

 

Thanks -just ckd the Gen II Fortitude -

Price is in my range, but the cheapest charging option is a $200 hand pump?   With a good scope, total would be high end of my range.  Being risk-averse I generally avoid buying "brand new" products that may have a bug or two revealed.  How does reliability compare for a PCP rifle (and the $200 3,000psi hand pump) vs a springer or gas piston?   Hadn't considered PCP since appeared to be priced above my range, therefore don't know much about PCP rifles or whether they're appropriate for my needs.


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-12 12:17:46  

Thanks for responses regarding scoping my 1400.  Based on them, spent more time Googling the scope option.  Apparently the original scope was the 3/4-inch "410" model. 

Not an enthusiast or interested in spending bench time tweaking or experimenting to find scope solutions -just want to get the 1400 scoped and set up "grab and go", or a new one with same goal.  Therefore, to scope the 1400 would want a "sure thing" proven setup.  Also considering contacting a factory authorized Crosman service station specializing in vintage to get options and a quote.  The 1400 still shoots decent, but probably get a rebuild/tune while at it to be good for a long while.  One forum thread had a good recommendation for a service provider. 


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Bob in WV
(@bob-in-wv)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 115
2019-05-12 12:26:46  

Six posts down, there is talk of a $30 pump and the reviews are pretty good it seems.  I have had a few Crosman pcp guns and they have been reliable and parts are cheap and available, which is not true for a lot of the cheaper pcps.  The Gen 2 Fortitude looks promising and I wouldn't be afraid of one at all.  It would be an easy gun to shoot and pump.

Good luck,

Bob in WV


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-12 12:56:03  
Posted by: Bob in WV

Six posts down, there is talk of a $30 pump and the reviews are pretty good it seems.  I have had a few Crosman pcp guns and they have been reliable and parts are cheap and available, which is not true for a lot of the cheaper pcps.  The Gen 2 Fortitude looks promising and I wouldn't be afraid of one at all.  It would be an easy gun to shoot and pump.

Good luck,

Bob in WV

Thanks for your vote of confidence regarding the new Gen 2 Fortitude reliability and parts availability.  It has a 10 round rotary magazine, which is a nice feature but saw bad reviews for the performance rotary mags on some pellet rifles.  Is this 10 round mag already proven on other Crosman products?

Are PCP rifles a good option for "1-shot use"?  ie:  Can PCP's be stored charged for long term, and grabbed for 1 shot periodically?

The performance of my 1400 after @45yr is impressive.  Would like to assume Crosman quality standards haven't slipped.  Based on what I've read, that appears to be true.

Some corporations now sell products that certainly don't match the quality of those they built their name on.


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stevevines
(@stevevines)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 145
2019-05-12 15:35:31  
Posted by: squirrelshootin
Posted by: Bob in WV

Six posts down, there is talk of a $30 pump and the reviews are pretty good it seems.  I have had a few Crosman pcp guns and they have been reliable and parts are cheap and available, which is not true for a lot of the cheaper pcps.  The Gen 2 Fortitude looks promising and I wouldn't be afraid of one at all.  It would be an easy gun to shoot and pump.

Good luck,

Bob in WV

Thanks for your vote of confidence regarding the new Gen 2 Fortitude reliability and parts availability.  It has a 10 round rotary magazine, which is a nice feature but saw bad reviews for the performance rotary mags on some pellet rifles.  Is this 10 round mag already proven on other Crosman products?

Are PCP rifles a good option for "1-shot use"?  ie:  Can PCP's be stored charged for long term, and grabbed for 1 shot periodically?

The performance of my 1400 after @45yr is impressive.  Would like to assume Crosman quality standards haven't slipped.  Based on what I've read, that appears to be true.

Some corporations now sell products that certainly don't match the quality of those they built their name on.

Sir, the aforementioned Crosman pcp's are direct descendants of your model 1400. Anything your 1400 can do, the new Crosman guns can do, with the exception of pumping themselves up. There are quite a few under $100.00 hands pumps available, if you just do a few searches on the internet.  Seems like a no brainer, but maybe that's just me -

 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
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Posts: 408
2019-05-12 16:40:00  
Posted by: stevevines... 

...Sir, the aforementioned Crosman pcp's are direct descendants of your model 1400. Anything your 1400 can do, the new Crosman guns can do, with the exception of pumping themselves up. There are quite a few under $100.00 hands pumps available, if you just do a few searches on the internet.  Seems like a no brainer, but maybe that's just me -

Steve, I've never owned a PCP rifle, although I have shot a couple of them and was very, very impressed.  One was the HW 100 in .177 caliber; and the other was a moderated DAQ in .357 or larger caliber IIRC.  Although I have a strong springer affinity and history, if I had the cash to spare, I might make the leap.  But...

I've read a lot and I've pondered it a lot.  If I was getting a PCP, there's no way I'd go with using a hand pump as my day-to-day method of charging the rifle.  It's just too much work IMO.  As a back-up air source, of course.  But, not the primary one.

I'd buy a tank and either 'pre-find' a local source for filling it (probably not that hard to do in the greater Houston area), or add the cost of my own compressor.  So, those costs (tank, and/or tank AND compressor), would have to be factored in as my cost of ownership.

I'm not lazy, I'm being practical as I see it.  If I had to use a pump to fill the gun, it would probably tire me out to the point where that day's shooting outing would be over for me.  And, if pumping to fill the gun seems too much for me, I can promise that pumping to top off a tank strikes me as being even worse.

My point as to this thread: If the potential owner is going to consider owning a PCP as an option, I think the air source device(s) need factored-in to maximize the fun factor.  Maybe it's just me.  Maybe I AM lazy--lol.

What do you think??

(Oh, in the short interim, squirrelshootin has added a post that seems to indicate he doesn't mind using a hand pump.  Well, we'll just see where this goes).

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-12 16:41:19  
Posted by: stevevines
Posted by: squirrelshootin
Posted by: Bob in WV

Six posts down, there is talk of a $30 pump and the reviews are pretty good it seems.  I have had a few Crosman pcp guns and they have been reliable and parts are cheap and available, which is not true for a lot of the cheaper pcps.  The Gen 2 Fortitude looks promising and I wouldn't be afraid of one at all.  It would be an easy gun to shoot and pump.

Good luck,

Bob in WV

Thanks for your vote of confidence regarding the new Gen 2 Fortitude reliability and parts availability.  It has a 10 round rotary magazine, which is a nice feature but saw bad reviews for the performance rotary mags on some pellet rifles.  Is this 10 round mag already proven on other Crosman products?

Are PCP rifles a good option for "1-shot use"?  ie:  Can PCP's be stored charged for long term, and grabbed for 1 shot periodically?

The performance of my 1400 after @45yr is impressive.  Would like to assume Crosman quality standards haven't slipped.  Based on what I've read, that appears to be true.

Some corporations now sell products that certainly don't match the quality of those they built their name on.

Sir, the aforementioned Crosman pcp's are direct descendants of your model 1400. Anything your 1400 can do, the new Crosman guns can do, with the exception of pumping themselves up. There are quite a few under $100.00 hands pumps available, if you just do a few searches on the internet.  Seems like a no brainer, but maybe that's just me -

 

Steve, thanks for your reply.  I don't have your knowledge and perspective on this topic, so something you consider a "no brainer" isn't for me.  Therefore, need help from this forum to get perspective from those with knowledge to ensure the correct choice is made and money well spent.  

I can Google $100 hand pumps, but would prefer a strong endorsement from posters here for their quality/reliability -and even better a recommendation for specific $100 hand pumps with proven high quality/reliability (and how long one can be expected to last).

I'm aware that PCP's are better than my 1400,  and above the springers and gas piston in general. I hope to get answers to my Q's regarding whether the rotary mag on the new Gen 2 Fortitude is considered already proven, whether a PCP is appropriate for my intended "grab and go" use (ie: left charged for long periods, and normally used for 1 shot).

Besides posting here, I'm searching the internet for related info.  For example, discovered that the Gen 2 Fortitude was a quick "mulligan" for the Gen 1 that was pulled off shelves shortly after introduced to make needed improvements.  Kudos to Crosman for that response, but reinforced my aversion to buying new products until they are proven with any identified issues addressed.

As of now working two concurrent options, to determine which has the best cost/benefit:  The decision is whether to scope the 1400, or buy whatever setup is the best replacement based on recommendations here and searching the internet.

Thanks for any perspective provided!

 


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Jonny Ordinary
(@jonnyordinary)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
2019-05-12 17:41:30  

Seneca Aspen or ATI Nova Liberty?


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-12 19:32:41  
Posted by: Jonny Ordinary

Seneca Aspen or ATI Nova Liberty?

Jonny, thanks for your reply.  Did some research on your recommendation.  From the Seneca Aspen manual:

Store with pressure between 4MPa ~ 8MPa (40bar ~ 80bar / 580psi ~ 1160psi)

That requires a lot of pumps to get to "hunting pressure", therefore doesn't meet "grab and go" requirement.  My 1400 needs only 6-8 pumps so I can grab it, then get eyes back on a squirrel and be ready much faster.  Also, appears the Aspen just went on the market early this year therefore would prefer to see an established record of low maintenance/high reliability.  

Understand that PCP's are the most desirable vs springers, gas piston etc.  The Aspen $400 price is in my range, but seems that a PCP may not be the best and most cost-effective option for my needs(?) 

To clarify my needs -I don't "hunt" squirrels.  When I hear or see one on my property, I "grab and go", take care of business, then get back to what I was doing.

Want a good quality pellet rifle/scope that will be grab and go, and require very little maintenance.  As posted above, the option to scope my 1400 also remains on the table, if a proven excellent scope setup and refresh can be done at reasonable cost.

Thanks! 

 

 

 


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
Member of Trade
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Posts: 243
2019-05-16 10:06:41  

Squirrelshootin;

While I do love DIANA's, and the 34 can play the role you want it to play; have you considered a 0.22"  cal Dragonfly?

It is a pump gun.

It can be improved with some judicious tweaking.

It can be easily scoped.

It's the closest I can think of to your trusty Cr1400: bolt action, pump-up, wood stocked, light, nimble and easy to shoot. About the same performance as well.

I do not see, in your application, the need for a magazine, though the Dragonfly has one. Your Cr1400 was a single shot and so is the best configuration for the Dragonfly.

It is not expensive. Just take a look into it:

https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Seneca_Dragonfly_Multi_Pump_Air_Rifle/4514

And about the 1/2"  scope, don't let people that don't know tell you things they shouldn't. While the 1/2" scopes DO exist (I have one), they were not meant for airguns.

😉

Keep us posted!

 

 

 

 

HM


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JiminPGH
(@jiminpgh)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 258
2019-05-16 10:55:02  

I was going to mention the Dragonfly as well.  Superb handling, and one simple mod to the pump head makes a huge difference in performance.  I usually shoot mine at 3 pumps in the basement, and seldom feel the need to go beyond 5 pumps outdoors.  A well-thought-out design at a reasonable price.


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squirrelshootin
(@squirrelshooter)
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 10
2019-05-16 17:36:09  

Thanks for the Dragonfly recommendations -that does appear to be the best recommendation posted for a Pumpmaster 1400 replacement. 

Replies on this thread set me straight regarding scoping the 1400 being a viable option, therefore I contacted a recommended factory authorized Crosman service station that specializes in vintage. 

The quote to drill/tap for a base, install a 3x32mm short scope, and replace seals is for much less than the Dragonfly.  There's also a lot of sentimental value to this option, since after @45 years I'm very fond of the 1400's quality/reliability.  Shipping soon, and excited to see how the 1400 shoots after serviced/scoped.  

Thanks to all who replied -I think you set me on the right path!


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Tim Ward
(@lefteyeshot)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 34
2019-05-16 21:08:22  

Pumper: Dragon Fly

PCP: Beeman QB Chief or Storm Rider

CO2: Sherdain 2060MB or Beeman QB78D. I'd prefer the AR2078

Guns are all less than $200 and all can be had in either caliber except the 2060MB, .22 only.

Scopes from Walmart; CP 3-9x32 mildot non AO $54 and change, Barska 3-9x32 regular cross hair non AO $26 and change. Easy to pick-up, easy to return.

Without hope, without fear


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Hector J Medina G
(@hector-j-medina-g)
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2019-05-17 09:22:52  
Posted by: squirrelshootin

Thanks for the Dragonfly recommendations -that does appear to be the best recommendation posted for a Pumpmaster 1400 replacement. 

Replies on this thread set me straight regarding scoping the 1400 being a viable option, therefore I contacted a recommended factory authorized Crosman service station that specializes in vintage. 

The quote to drill/tap for a base, install a 3x32mm short scope, and replace seals is for much less than the Dragonfly.  There's also a lot of sentimental value to this option, since after @45 years I'm very fond of the 1400's quality/reliability.  Shipping soon, and excited to see how the 1400 shoots after serviced/scoped.  

Thanks to all who replied -I think you set me on the right path!

Great!

Nothing like an old girlfriend's arms . . .  😉

Keep us posted!

 

 

HM


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killerkawi
(@killerkawi)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
2019-05-19 15:33:37  

 

I modified a crosman steel 2240 breech to fit the tube of my 1400 so that I could use the 2240 7/16" barrel on it as well as have a dovetail for scope mounting. It a simple process of locating the countersunk screw hole in the 2240 breech to align with the stock barrels hold down screw that holds the barrel and sliding valve pin block in place. The rear barrel/tube plug screw hole in the factory barrel is in the same location between the 1400 and 2240 platforms so if it is used as a reference point to locate the new hole to be drilled and countersunk in the 2240 breech and its a plug and play swap. You also need to modify and old steel 760 style front pump arm/barrel band for a longer than 20" barrel or can buy an aftermarket metal 760 style front barrel band. The pump arm pivot hole in the 760 barrel band will need relocated to accommodate the 1400 pivot pin location, again a simple process. You will need to either JB weld up the stock 4/48 hold down screw hole in the 2240 breech or do as I did and grind the threaded end of the 4/48 screw down to allow it to sit flush in the factory screw hole and JB welded in place to aid in pellet loading.  If the hole is not filled it causes pellet to dip the head into the hole and scar pellet. I also placed a piece of black duct tape to fit over the 1400 countersunk screw slot and the JB welded in the modified head of the 4/48 screw to provide a smooth loading trough for the pellets to slide into the leade damage free. screw

 

I have a 24" disco barrel on mine set up for 12fpe at 8 pumps with AA8.44s for use in our clubs UKHFT matches. It shoots 8.44s at the following fps per pumps strokes.

4pumps=650fps, 5==690, 6=730, 7=760 and 8 =190fps.

IMG 2188[1]


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killerkawi
(@killerkawi)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
2019-05-19 15:38:13  

The attached photo is with a 26' maximus barrel in .177 that I have since switched to and the above fps/pumps figures were with the 26' barrel where as the 24 disco barrel was only 10 fps slower per pump. I also tried a modified Avanti 853 LW barrel on it at 20" and found a loss of approx. 30 fps per pumps and no significant difference in accuracy between the LW and maximus barrels just fps per pimp differences.

 

Staying with a .22 cal would be the same with just barrel and probe changes.

It is also 100% reversible so does not modify the 1400 but just the 2240 breech and front barrel band is replaced.

 

Mike


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Doug Wall
(@doug-wall)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 103
2019-05-19 20:02:11  
Posted by: Hector J Medina G

Squirrelshootin

And about the 1/2"  scope, don't let people that don't know tell you things they shouldn't. While the 1/2" scopes DO exist (I have one), they were not meant for airguns.

😉

Keep us posted!

 

 

 

 

HM

Wow!  I've never seen a 1/2" scope. Who made it, when, and what was the application?

Learn something new every day. Thanks

 

 

 

 


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