Artillary hold and ...
 

Artillary hold and sand bag rested experience for me gas ram  

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DonC
 DonC
(@donc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 110
2019-10-08 20:02:58  

Tom Gaylord has done some recent reviews where he said he got good results while resting gas rams on a sand bag without artillery hold. I have been doing the same and discovered something that is probably common knowledge to most guys. I got excellent results off the sand bag as long as the rifle was resting forward of the trigger guard and near the center of gravity. Other resting positions were poor.

My springers still prefer artillery old. I guess the quick firing cycle of gas ram is the reason.

You probably knew this already. Just my 2 cents.

DonC….Enjoy our great sport.


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-10-08 20:41:50  
Posted by: @donc

Tom Gaylord has done some recent reviews where he said he got good results while resting gas rams on a sand bag without artillery hold. I have been doing the same and discovered something that is probably common knowledge to most guys. I got excellent results off the sand bag as long as the rifle was resting forward of the trigger guard and near the center of gravity. Other resting positions were poor.

My springers still prefer artillery old. I guess the quick firing cycle of gas ram is the reason.

You probably knew this already. Just my 2 cents.

DonC….Enjoy our great sport.

Both are really spring guns, although the shot cycle does feel different.  If you find something that works for you on a particular air gun, I say don't bother to over think it--just do what works.

The gas rams do have a different feel to the firing cycle, though. I remember when the 'old' Beeman catalogs listed the cocking efforts of all air guns in the catalog. A rifle like the R10 might say, "35 lbs", while the gas rammed RX ( and its variants) said "30-45 lbs" (those were the exact numbers, I still remember them). At first I thought the 15 lb. span was related to the fact that the ram was adjustable for power, (which it was for a time).  But, after I shot one for the first time, I came to believe it might mean something else.

A metal coiled mainspring gun like the R10 was, by comparison, very easy to get the piston moving at the beginning of the cocking stroke, while the rams didn't start moving until you had applied quite a bit of cocking effort to the end of the barrel. Then with a little more effort, the gun was fully cocked. I think that might have been the 15 lb. span that was being referred to, from the start to the end of the cocking stroke.  So, what I'm getting at, is that they do have their own unique behavior, and I could see where that might translate to what works best in the way of holds, also.

As a footnote, once you've found the spot where a given rifle wants to be held, it might not be so hard to remember if all you have is one or two guns, and you shoot them frequently. But if you have a lot of guns, and/ or you seldom shoot them, you'll need some way to remember where the hold is best applied, so you don't have to start the process all over again every time you have a shooting session.

What seems to work pretty well while you're doing your initial testing is a piece of masking tape, that you can move to and fro on the stock as you test various hold positions. That way you don't have to look, you can feel it with your fingers or thumb. Once you've identified it,  for a  permanent reminder, a lot of people don't want that masking tape on their stock. An idea that wasn't mine but that works well, is to place a little piece of automobile pinstriping tape on the stock to remind you where to hold it by feel, and it's almost invisible.

Since you mentioned how  important an exact hold position is, I thought I'd throw this tidbit in here as being a good place to say it.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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sonnysan
(@sonnysan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 168
2019-10-08 21:07:30  

I have been saying this for over 20 years.  All you need are poly pellets (and not sand) in your bags. 


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josh3rd
(@josh3rd)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 113
2019-10-09 00:31:21  

Good info from you guys...thanks


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DonC
 DonC
(@donc)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 110
2019-10-09 09:06:26  

@sonnysan

Sonnysan,

Thanks for your tip. I'll give it a try. Are polypellets about 1/8" dia? Where is the best place to buy them?

TIA


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sonnysan
(@sonnysan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 168
2019-10-09 09:10:24  

I bought them at walmart.  This was many years ago, but this is what you are after:

https://www.amazon.com/Fairfield-PP2B-Poly-Pellets-Weighted-Stuffing/dp/B0077AQ0W8/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=poly+pellets&qid=1570630059&sr=8-4

Make sure to only fill the bag to around 80-85%.  If you top it off the bag will be as hard as a rock, defeating the purpose.  This principle applies to all hand held guns, despite what Gaylord will tell you.

 


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-10-09 12:06:50  

I've posted it before, but I've found that a 2 lb. bag of rice from the grocery store works pretty well as a front rest. It's cheap, easy to obtain, and you don't have to worry about grains of sand ever escaping the bag to scratch the underside of your stock. I just keep it out of the kitchen and with my guns so I don't mistake it for a bag to be used for cooking. I'm talking about the possibility of its having some lead dust on it. If the bag ever springs a leak, some packing tape or duct tape takes care of it in a jiffy. And, best of all, it provides a nice stable rest.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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Faucetguy
(@faucetguy)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 82
2019-10-09 18:47:43  

Ed, I use rice as well.  Works with most of my SPRINGERS.  R1 and tuned R9 not as well.

 

 


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caninesinaction
(@caninesinaction)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 49
2019-10-09 19:09:10  

One more vote for rice: I bought cheap pair of sweat pants, cut off legs, filled with rice, ends sealed with tie wraps,  and used for my spring guns. Had excellent results with the Diana M-Tec 350. I use these same "bags" for my powder burners. Low cost, durable, and effective. 😀


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ekmeister
(@ekmeister)
Member of Trade
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 459
2019-10-09 19:51:05  

@faucetguy

You can buy rice in burlap bags, or something that looks like Burlap to me if you prefer that outer covering. It will work. But, I lean toward the plastic bags. Because, unlike sand, if the rice gets wet, you have a real mess on your hands and it can't be used again. It takes a long time for sand to dry out, but it does eventually dry out. In the meantime, it hasn't turned into some kind of mush. And, the sand won't attract assorted vermin and insect infestation. And, as previously mentioned, a tear in the plastic can be fixed with just a simple piece of tape.

Safe and Happy Shooting!

Ed, the Airgun TuneMeister

https://www.airguntunemeister.com/


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