Any love for the FW...
 

Any love for the FWB 150?  

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Kingfisher1961
(@kingfisher1961)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 222
2019-05-23 18:58:49  

Look up FWB on the Internet these days and be ready for a deluge of casual sex sites!  How things change.

The FWB 150 is a classic example of how much things have changed in the airgun world over the last 50 years.  It harkens back to a time when Spring rifles like it were cutting edge technology.  A time when for a few years....form and function reached a pinnacle IMO.  The stock oozes quality.  It's  sleek and sexy shape almost overshadowed it's "new" technology. 

The whole action is attached to a sliding rail.  When the rifle is fired, the recoil force of the spring is absorbed and disapated by the motion of the action sliding back on the rail.  A virtually recoiless rifle is the result.  It's a simple, yet ingenious way of gaining accuracy. 

My favorite part about shooting the 150 is the side cocking lever system.  It  is without question one of the most impressive sounding noises I have ever heard an airgun  make.  Akin to winding an old Swiss Grandfather Clock.   And the precision....oh that old time German precision! !!!  It is evident in every milimeter right down to the gorgeous hand cut checkering.  Everything about these old beauties has been lost in an age of 3D printing.  They are literally hand crafted works of art that if produced today would cost in the thousands!  Old Hans and Franz who made them have long since past. 

Personally,  I am an old school kinda guy.  I yearn for the quality of products from days gone by.  Everything made today is obsolete in 5 years.  Plastic rules.  I guess it was inevitable.  All good things must come to an end.  Thankfully I have a lovely relic from 5 decades ago that still works perfectly.  She still makes me smile ...............every time.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2019-05-23 22:41:23  

the 150's seem to be few and far between, I happen to look at Egun in Germany and there fists full of 300's but seldom a 150 is listed and if they are rare in Germany they are rare here

a few pictures would be nice if you stop stroking your 150 LOL

that's alright we can look at the picture from Vintage

https://forum.vintageairgunsgallery.com/feinwerkbau-rifles/feinwerkbau-model-150/

Mike


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Kingfisher1961
(@kingfisher1961)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 222
2019-05-24 08:09:33  

Mar

I tried and tried to post pics.....between strokes!!!  Screen keeps crashing.  Thanks for the link.  That tyro 150 is magnificent! 


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2019-05-24 14:07:38  

old guns are some of the best I'm kind of the Diana side of things and never got to the FWB 150-300 rifles but they are great guns

you take the price of those guns new and put them in today money and the are scary expensive

out of the Beeman Jan 1 1995 retail price less a 300s right hand was 1245.00 a FWB 601 walnut was 1650.00 Crow Magnum were 1195.00

no 150's listed and it is the only price list I have for Beeman

I never tried adding pictures I'm sure I would have trouble also

Mike


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Kingfisher1961
(@kingfisher1961)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 222
2019-05-24 18:11:44  

 

In reference to the old price points, you have demonstrated what I was saying.  IF you could find a gunsmith capable of producing a rifle like a 150 or a D60, it would cost thousands.  The fact that a perfect one can still be had for a fraction of that cost is truly a blessing in disguise! !!


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2019-05-24 18:42:00  

well I think the lack of numbers of the 150 that came to the state, I guess offered by Beeman makes it a rarer rifle then most

but as of this post 99 members, me being one have read some of the thread

I think many of these guns are sitting in cabinets or cases not being shot much at all but also not being put up for sale  

but about the love part, my feeling is those who do own them like them very much and those who don't wish someone would put one up for sale so they could have a chance to try one and own one

as I have always said, it is a buy to try world and if you can't do the first part the second part never happens, unless there is a friend that shares

In any case take care

mike

Mike


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Prairie Farmer
(@prairie-farmer)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 159
2019-05-24 21:46:07  

I have never seen a 150 in the flesh, but I have eyeballed them for sale in the past.  I have several 300's, I love the engineering work in these, and the machining and such that went into them.  Hard to find things of good quality now days.  Sad thing is I think I would be willing to pay a good price in todays money if they were still built.

Mike, if I get time this weekend  I will check my price sheets and see if I can see a FWB 150 priced in them.  I have a good stack of documents from a Beeman dealer given to me.

🎯

Jason G  

Everybody gotta die sometime Red.


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ribbonstone
(@ribbonstone)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 238
2019-05-24 22:14:41  

If a little less velocity (and lets face it, the FWB 300 isn't exactly a "barn burner") and a more rounded stock is a plus,look for an old 150.  TheFWB 300 does normally have a few more FPS and a more modern looking "angular"stock…..but I do think the older 150 was the nicer feeling of the two stocks.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2019-05-24 22:39:22  

well they better be old because they stopped make the 150 in 1968 and in the Blue Book they mention a FWB model 200,  a what, so much to learn so little time

the 200 isn't listed at Feinwerkbau, I thought a had never seen one mention but it is in the BB

 

the oldest Beeman catalog I have is 1986 a tattered one at that

Mike


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Riversidesports
(@riversidesports)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 16
2019-05-24 22:52:15  

Well I doubt you will find 150's listed in Beeman data, I believe they may predate Doc's company

The only active importer of the 150 series guns back in the 60s was Daisy and once the 300 sport model came out, the 150 was discontinued by Feinwerkebau.  This means practically the only 150 rifles you find in America are Daisy branded.  Same is somewhat true of the early 300 sport models too.

300 Sporters have a very similar stock to the 150 series rifles

If anyone is interested I have a flawless Daisy badged example.  Rate it 99%+ bright shiny blue, lightly stripped stock just a couple extremely minor compression marks, I'd put the wood at 98%.  Just sold a similar 150 over the winter...yeah I'm kinda into the quality in these.  Just have too many AGs and this one is pristine, not some well worn example out of the Eurozone.  Won't be as cheap as a common 300S model though.

My understanding is there were not a great number of 150 rifles manufactured compared to the 300S series

even the 300 Sport Models are pretty uncommon


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Hooligan
(@hooligan)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 90
2019-05-25 02:29:30  

When ever I have asked the question, which is the better of the two models, I have always been told the 300s model. I did end up getting a left hand model 300s when it became available, however, there is something about the 150 that keeps me drawn to her yet I have yet to own or handle one. One day there will be a 150 added to my collection of vintage FWB's.

Cheers


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daveshoot
(@daveshoot)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 64
2019-05-25 09:23:30  

Like the man said, Giss is bliss. I don't know if my pic will post, but I was lucky to find one on the old YC a couple years ago.

FWB150

 


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bf1956
(@bf1956)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 79
2019-05-25 11:08:33  

I have a 150 with out the stock and hardware and have not been able to locate one, what might my options be ?


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Riversidesports
(@riversidesports)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 16
2019-05-25 12:20:36  

Having owned and currently owning both 150 and 300 rifles I can tell you there is extremely little difference in functionality

I do find that the 150 seems of slightly better fitment on the wood work

Something to be well aware of is that while the 300 Sport Model was billed as an improved gun it was in some ways cheaply made.  FWB shifted from hand cut checkering to stipple and went to a plastic trigger that's known for breakage.  That was one of a few changes made in the transition to the final 300S model

The Daisy 150 rifles came in as full Match guns.  Many of the Euro sold 150 rifles were straight Sport Models with pencil barrels.  Note every example imaged in the Vintage Airguns link above are light barrel guns.  Daisy badged FWB 150 rifles all have 300S pattern heavy barrels, never seen one otherwise fitted

The main downside if any to the 150 series is parts.  There are basic components that are interchangeable however the receiver tubes differ in length between the 150 & 300 series rifles, if I remember correctly the 300 has a slightly shorter receiver so stocks are not a direct swap between the two models.  I suppose it could be done though and the best canidate would be a 300 Sport Model stock which is, well a bit scarce too

Pretty sure seals, rings and perhaps the spring itself are interchangeable, or at least so I have been told.  I have never had to get inside any of my own 150's, they have all been either new old stock or nearly so.  Seen new 150 springs through various online vendors though so it's a rather moot point people.

I grew up lusting for a 150.  Handled one as a young boy that was a display gun in a local Gambles Hardware Store.  It was just crazy money in that time frame.  Years later after the store closed I bought it from the former store owner, alas his wife had tossed the box but that really wasn't too big a deal, they were shipped in simple brown cardboard anyways.

Anyways, if you want the ultimate in FWB springers the Daisy 150 rifles have a great deal going for them in that they represent a fusion between a classic sporter stocked Euro AG fitted up to a match grade barreled action.  Main issue is Daisy never brought in large numbers of the 150 guns, they were extremely spendy even early on.


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Riversidesports
(@riversidesports)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 16
2019-05-25 12:51:03  

Here's the 150 I am currently offering, it's about impossible to upgrade from condition wise:

[IMG] [/IMG]

Note the Heavy Barrel Match configuaration

Being frank & bluntly honest I'm not a huge fan of the angular stock of the 300S series rifles

I greatly prefer either the 150 or 300 Sport Model furniture though the Tyros are Awesome too albeit even rarer.


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MDriskill
(@mdriskill)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 131
2019-05-25 13:05:34  

Don’t make rash assumptions from the number of responses. This is not a collector’s forum in general I’m afraid, but there is a dedicated sub-cult of us that are ga-ga for the oldsters!

The models 150, 300, and 300S had more or less identical power plants, but some external differences. The cocking arm got shorter with each successive model, the barrel length varied (longest on the 300, shorter on the 150 and 300S), the trigger was modified quite a bit between the 150 and 300, and of course the stock evolution as already discussed.

All three models have serial numbers in the same sequence, an indication the changes between them were evolutionary rather than revolutionary. I believe the 150 was imported by Air Rifle Headquarters in West Virginia by the way, in addition to Daisy.

With the sporter-type styling and hand-cut checkering, the 150 is definitely the most old-school of the three. The 150 Tyrolean may be the prettiest of all FWB’s (the 300 and 300S Tyros look a little weird to me, the straight stippled grip contrasting oddly with the uber-curvy cheekpiece). I wouldn’t describe the later models as more “cheaply” made, but just modified to keep up with progress in the competition world; in their day these were the best Olympic-class match guns money could buy after all, not just pleasure shooters.

I never cease to be amazed at the quality control of the Feinwerkbau springers. From the first 150 to the last 300S there are zero compromises in how they are assembled and finished. Biggest knock on the 150 these days may be lack of parts; trigger bits in particular are pretty much made of unobtanium.

 

 

 


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Riversidesports
(@riversidesports)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 16
2019-05-25 13:24:50  

Well I should have been more clear.  The 300 Sport Model that replaced the 150 was much more cheaply manufactured in that it initially incorporated a straight plastic trigger.  Nope, no detachable shoe, just a craptastic piece of plastic.  I have one of those on the bench right now with a sheared off trigger blade.  When I get to it, it's getting updated with a 300S trigger with detachable shoe.  I have had to do this operation twice in the past

First one was perhaps a decade ago.  New in the box 300, in under 50 shots the trigger just sheared away.  Seriously poor plastic that worse yet degrades over time.  FWB changed that all up in the 300S...completely different trigger with a detachable adjustable shoe.

Yes, forgot about ARH, they were around very early too.  Not altogether certain on this but I seem to recall there was a period Daisy had exclusive distribution rights for FWB in America hence the factory Daisy badging by FWB for the US Market.  Not sure how long Daisy held distribution rights.  I recall some discussion that ARH had been side stepping around Daisy importing from a third party.  I do know that in the final quarter of the 1970s FWBs being sold by Daisy were no longer Daisy badged.

This all comes from memory, used to know a fellow who had been with Daisy until he retired in the early 80s who had nothing good to say about ARH and Doc over cutting into their distribution agreements with FWB years before.


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marflow
(@marflow)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 631
2019-05-25 14:38:51  

Feinwerkbau 150: Part 3

some reading and I was wondering where Mike Driskill was, now I don't have to

so bf1956 needs a stock, will a 150 fit into a 300 stock and if so it gives him a better chance to restock his action

and bf1956 if I were looking for a 150 stock I would look on the German auction site Egun, you have to do some begging but things we need here in the states are often there, bits and pieces can be had, you can only drool at the guns and there cheap prices

well you can see what the Germans think of the 150 look at the last listing and be sitting down

http://www.egun.de/market/list_items.php?mode=qry&plusdescr=off&wheremode=and&query=feinwerkbau+150&quick=1

one  nice,  one not so nice and one in the hole crap  what were they thinking

Mike


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bf1956
(@bf1956)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 79
2019-05-25 15:08:47  

Thanks marflow, I do have 300s and Jr. and will be checking that out.


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Riversidesports
(@riversidesports)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 16
2019-05-25 15:15:00  

Could also check with Jim Edmundson

He used to advertise & post on the old Yellow until some Mod wanted him to pay commercial rates to use the marketplace.  He just dropped even posting here.  Anyways Jim does some imports of club guns out of Europe, often has loose parts for FWBs from torn down rifles.  You can find him over on Brad's site, truly a gentleman to deal with.


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bf1956
(@bf1956)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 79
2019-05-25 18:20:15  

Yes Sir, I have bought from Jim and he is a gentleman at that!


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MDriskill
(@mdriskill)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 131
2019-05-26 06:02:01  
Posted by: Riversidesports

Could also check with Jim Edmundson

He used to advertise & post on the old Yellow until some Mod wanted him to pay commercial rates to use the marketplace.  He just dropped even posting here.  Anyways Jim does some imports of club guns out of Europe, often has loose parts for FWBs from torn down rifles.  You can find him over on Brad's site, truly a gentleman to deal with.

It may be temporarily hard to contact Jim E - I’ve heard the happy rumor he’s in Europe on a buying trip. Yippee!


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MDriskill
(@mdriskill)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 131
2019-05-26 06:29:25  
Posted by: Riversidesports

Well I should have been more clear.  The 300 Sport Model that replaced the 150 was much more cheaply manufactured in that it initially incorporated a straight plastic trigger.  Nope, no detachable shoe, just a craptastic piece of plastic.  I have one of those on the bench right now with a sheared off trigger blade.  When I get to it, it's getting updated with a 300S trigger with detachable shoe.  I have had to do this operation twice in the past

First one was perhaps a decade ago.  New in the box 300, in under 50 shots the trigger just sheared away.  Seriously poor plastic that worse yet degrades over time.  FWB changed that all up in the 300S...completely different trigger with a detachable adjustable shoe.

Yes, forgot about ARH, they were around very early too.  Not altogether certain on this but I seem to recall there was a period Daisy had exclusive distribution rights for FWB in America hence the factory Daisy badging by FWB for the US Market.  Not sure how long Daisy held distribution rights.  I recall some discussion that ARH had been side stepping around Daisy importing from a third party.  I do know that in the final quarter of the 1970s FWBs being sold by Daisy were no longer Daisy badged.

Back in the day, there was a period where it was thought that plastic (which has the interesting characteristic of never feeling particularly hot or cold to the touch) was good for the contact points on a match gun. The beautifully-crafted Diana 60-series rifles also used a plastic trigger blade, and FWB, Diana, Walther and Anschutz all had plastic trigger guards, for this reason. The shoe on the second-version 300S trigger is plastic too (and also has durability issues - they tend to split down the middle under the pressure of the screw underneath - ask me how I know! 😬 ).

I agree 100% that plastic triggers turned out to be a bad idea in the long run! But they were done for what seemed like a good reason at the time, and to “keep up with the Jones” in a very competitive market. IMHO, the otherwise high-quality construction on these classics clearly implies that shaving manufacturing pennies by “cheapening” this critical spot was not the intent.

Guns tend to go through design fads just like many other things, and "square” stocks were a regrettable one that came and went in the 70’s. Seemed all cool and modern at the time, but today look as odd as 70's hairstyles! The resulting FWB 300S Match, Walther LGV Spezial, HW 55 CM, Hammerli Match, and Diana 66 are not my fave match rifle classics aesthetically speaking, but handle better than they look at least. There were some pretty graceless sporter rifles made in those days too by the way.

I appreciate the interesting comments on the Daisy-imported FWB match guns. I have a 1974 300S with Daisy markings, and had long wondered how the Daisy vs. ARH thing played out!


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DanWesson
(@danwesson)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 34
2019-05-26 16:20:43  

Nice thread / discussion. I hope to eventually add a FWB 150 to my collection. I recently purchased a FWB 300s Junior from Jim E and I am amazed at the functionality. Not surprised by the accuracy, however. It's a Feinwerkbau! 


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Franklink1
(@franklink1)
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 9
2019-05-26 22:50:19  

IMG 20180712 221509
IMG 20180602 212716
IMG 20180602 212650
IMG 20180713 022056

IMG 20180520 021620

I went through a 300 variant phase. 

There are four different stocks in these pics.

The stock and gun I like the most is the Daisy branded 300. It has beautiful grain and lacks the pregnant-looking deep forestock and square edges of the 300s stocks.  I also like the look of the full length shroud and the omission of the muzzle weight seen on the 300s guns. 

The lighter, blond stock is a 300s Mini.

The walnut stock is a 300s stock.

Finally, the reddish stock is a Chinese copy of a 300s. Yes, there was a point that the Chinese were making 300s copies. The history of the  action for the clone I never knew.  Just the stock was included when I purchased the walnut stocked 300s. If you look closely you'll see the walnut stock is a lefty. The Chinese copy stock was a righty. I reworked the clone and made the authentic 300s action fit. 

I eventually sold everything but the Mini and the Daisy branded 300. 

I'm not much for having duplicates in my airgun collection but the 300 variants are just cool enough to qualify. I have a hard time not buying every one that I see come up for sale. 


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Sammi1968
(@sammi1968)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
2019-05-27 12:42:21  

I'll jump in. Have a few 300s unfortunately they are all right handed however I shoot left handed.  I can still shoot the righties from the wrong side but always a compromise. A fine gentleman offered me a lefty 150 with the caveat that the are a pretty rare bird. We were able to work it out and it joined the collection. Lovely to shoot, and feels much more comfortable in your hands.  Just last week I picked up a lefty 300s so now I have a set. Great rifles.

photostudio 1558977226194

 

Back one is the older rifle. Front is a 1976 model.

photostudio 1558977194311


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Kingfisher1961
(@kingfisher1961)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 222
2019-05-28 03:32:38  

Well guys, you have all made wonderful contributions to this thread.  I'm very pleased to see and hear that the venerable FWB150 still has a following. 

I was extremely fortunate to obtain an in the original box "closet queen".   It had been recently serviced prepped for sale.  

When I got it, it was covered in what originally appeared to be rub marks all over the stock.  When I was bidding on it, I thought a possible refinishing would be needed. However, it turned out to be some kind of smudging.....possibly wax from the box???  

I sprayed it down with Goo Gone and gently buffed it with a terri-clothe.  Then I wiped it clean and buffed some more with a dry clothe.  Finally,  I wiped it with some oil.  It came out like new!!!

That cleaning coupled with the perfect....and I mean perfect...bluing, and the fresh tune added up to be the best buy I got in some time!  Kudos to the seller as well for going the extra mile to pack everything. ...including that pristine original box....so very well.

This wasn't my first 150.  That one was a totally beat up old Daisy version .....but it shot oh so nicely.  I foolishly parted with that rifle several years ago.  I regretted it badly.  I even tried to somehow replace it but the 150 eluded me.  Tried several others...RWS75 was nice, but still didn't like the look.  To angular.  Tried a Hyscore 810m....didn't like the break barrel on the bench.  Wanted the rifle to sit while I cocked it.  The search continued until a few months back when I finally found my current 150.  

Now that the quest to find it is over, the joy of shooting a functional work of art has begun.  I am amazed at the performance of this timeless beauty.  Every shot is a test of my ability because this rifle does its part every time....even after 50 years!


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Hairsmith
(@hairsmith)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 11
2019-05-28 11:49:44  

I enjoy my FWB 150, came to me from a customer that acquired it for a debt owed to him.

Thank goodness he never fired it, I tore it down and cleaned years of old lube dirt & dust out of it. I resealed it as the originals had given up. Gun shoots to spec. And gives pleasure every time it come out. In fact I am keeping it and selling my FWB 601!   


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Regsmeeton
(@regsmeeton)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 8
2019-05-28 19:45:24  

I have a FWB 150 I got some time ago which was said to have been factory refinished. Certainly looks like new. I don’t need it, but as you can imagine, I’m really reluctant to let it go. I think that I’ll take it to Hickory this year and just see if I get an interesting trade offer. I have an adequate number of match rifles, so I might be interested in a more sporting arm. 

 Jack

Education,n. That which discloses to the wise and disguises from the foolish their lack of understanding.


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bf1956
(@bf1956)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 79
2019-05-30 12:06:39  

Hey marflow I put the 150 barreled action in a 300 mini stock . looks like it might fit if I remove some wood for the longer cocking lever. And it also felt good at the shoulder, now if only I can find a 300 stock.


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