Start shooting ducks, geese and rabbits if legal.  

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KW
 KW
(@kw)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 157
November 18, 2018 16:05  

Turn that lead into gold!

Wanted something different for dinner this holiday.

Ducks are impossible to find locally in the grocer.  DArtagnan online will sell you a duck for $50.  A rabbit will cost you $40 from the same folks.

Local grocer had geese.  I figured at $17.49 for a frozen goose it was a bargain.  Got to the check out and re-read the price tag:  $71.49.  Yes, the better part of a Benjie for a domestic goose that was frozen and more fat than meat.  Took that back to the freezer.  Will do Cornish game hen instead.

 

EXPERIENCE, n. The wisdom that enables us to recognize as an undesirable old acquaintance the folly that we have already embraced.


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El pelletas
(@el-pelletas)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 116
November 18, 2018 16:56  

Man, I had about 500$ worth of rabbits in the front yard 😉,that until a old fat cat showed up, bastard, now there is one lonely rabbit left.. I haven't had rabbit in a looong time. 

Land and Liberty.......


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banjobart
(@banjobart)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
January 15, 2019 10:32  

Aim for the base of the neck to drop geese. They will paddle air for a minute then expire. All that's needed is a 177 at 800 FPS.


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Beeman22
(@beeman22)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 71
January 15, 2019 15:57  

Ducks and geese are migratory birds and subject to the Migratory Bird Act, which puts it on the Secretary of the Interior "to determine…conventions to allow hunting…and to adopt suitable regulations permitting and governing the same " That's another way of saying the statute authorizes the government to establish regulations on hunting. 

According to current federal regulations, "No persons shall take migratory game birds...With a trap, snare, net, rifle, pistol, swivel gun, shotgun larger than 10 gauge, punt gun, battery gun, machinegun, fish hook, poison, drug, explosive, or stupefying substance..." And, of course, you can't use lead.

So it would seem that the question is this: Does an air rifle fit the legal definition of a rifle with respect to current federal regulations? I don't know the answer, but Federal law in 8 U.S. Code § 921 - Definitions states: 

The term “rifle” means a weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder and designed or redesigned and made or remade to use the energy of an explosive to fire only a single projectile through a rifled bore for each single pull of the trigger.

Taken together, that would seem to allow the use of an air rifle to take waterfowl but you'd have to use non-lead pellets. But I am not a lawyer - anyone with more legal knowledge care to share any thoughts? Anyone know a friendly conservation officer who could opine on this topic? I, for one, would really like to know.

-Shareef


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banjobart
(@banjobart)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 4
January 30, 2019 20:11  

We need a tall net on the Canadian border to keep the geese out. Maybe after the wall is built. I can only hope.


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rkia
 rkia
(@rkia)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 8
January 31, 2019 08:08  

Some people would say the net is for keeping  the 'Canadian geese' in Canada. 😉 


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Frank in Fairfield
(@frank-in-fairfield)
Joined: 10 months ago
Posts: 129
January 31, 2019 08:14  
Posted by: Beeman22

Ducks and geese are migratory birds and subject to the Migratory Bird Act, which puts it on the Secretary of the Interior "to determine…conventions to allow hunting…and to adopt suitable regulations permitting and governing the same " That's another way of saying the statute authorizes the government to establish regulations on hunting. 

According to current federal regulations, "No persons shall take migratory game birds...With a trap, snare, net, rifle, pistol, swivel gun, shotgun larger than 10 gauge, punt gun, battery gun, machinegun, fish hook, poison, drug, explosive, or stupefying substance..." And, of course, you can't use lead.

So it would seem that the question is this: Does an air rifle fit the legal definition of a rifle with respect to current federal regulations? I don't know the answer, but Federal law in 8 U.S. Code § 921 - Definitions states: 

The term “rifle” means a weapon designed or redesigned, made or remade, and intended to be fired from the shoulder and designed or redesigned and made or remade to use the energy of an explosive to fire only a single projectile through a rifled bore for each single pull of the trigger.

Taken together, that would seem to allow the use of an air rifle to take waterfowl but you'd have to use non-lead pellets. But I am not a lawyer - anyone with more legal knowledge care to share any thoughts? Anyone know a friendly conservation officer who could opine on this topic? I, for one, would really like to know.

And, you cannot shoot ducks, geese with lead!

Stay safe and free..


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Hepotter
(@hepotter)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 67
January 31, 2019 14:15  

The use of lead in shooting people is also frowned upon!!!


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BeemanR7
(@beemanr7)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 15
January 31, 2019 14:57  

I've recently been informed that a pellet gun is considered a "firearm" according to the law. I'm not a lawyer; only a galley crewman aboard Slaveship U.S.A.


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pluric
(@pluric)
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 376
January 31, 2019 15:05  
Posted by: BeemanR7

I've recently been informed that a pellet gun is considered a "firearm" according to the law. I'm not a lawyer; only a galley crewman aboard Slaveship U.S.A.

My understanding is if it doesn't use "an explosive device" to propel the projectile it's not considered a fire arm by the Feds. Individual States may regulate it differently.

fords.org/gun-laws/state-law/50-state-summaries/non-powder-guns-state-by-state/

 


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